Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

nhssos

Recent activity

Comments (9)

  • Comment on: Why are nurses paying for bankers' mistakes?

    nhssos's comment 27 August, 2011 8:50 pm

    It is heartening to see that some nurses becoming concerned about the likely changes to our pensions. The Government is feeding the public lies. There is a surplus in the NHS 'pension pot' which is essentially going into Government coffers. The increases in contributions will mean that nurses and many other workers fund the deficit even further. Hutton has also stated that the cost of public sector pensions will decrease after 2014. The Government clearly do not need to have this fight with NHS staff. Andrew Lansley seems to have grasped this (even if he has not grasped many other issues within the NHS) and is reported to be opposed to the ConDem plans to attack our pensions. I understand that many nurses (amongst others) may be frustrated with their trade union organisations and, indeed, it is good to see them developing a united stand against the pension changes. However, I would ask whether any of those nurses who have have expressed their anger/dismay at the pension changes in online discussion sites like this one have responded to or plan to respond to the formal DH consultation on pensions - which is open until October? I would also respectfully suggest that any union is only as good as its members. Yes, the union leadership have a responsibility to listen to the members but union members also have a duty to make their views known directly within their organisations. The RCN website has requested member views to feed into the consultation. I wonder how many RCN members have done so? Despite the problems being faced by nurses - the pay freeze, increments and pensions under threat, the cost of living increasing etc - I do not see larger numbers of nurses turning up to union branch meetings or otherwise participating collectively to oppose the Government and defend our corner. If our voices are loud enough our union leadership will have to listen and that will benefit us

  • Comment on: Health unions make plans for pensions walk out

    nhssos's comment 27 August, 2011 8:41 pm

    It is heartening to see some nurses becoming concerned about the likely changes to our pensions. The Government is feeding the public lies. There is a surplus in the NHS 'pension pot' which is essentially going into Government coffers. The increases in contributions will mean that nurses and many other workers fund the deficit even further. Hutton has also stated that the cost of public sector pensions will decrease after 2014. The Government clearly do not need to have this fight with NHS staff. Andrew Lansley seems to have grasped this (even if he has not grasped many others) and is reported to be opposed to the ConDEm plans to attack our pensions. I understand that many nurses (amongst others) may be frustrated with their trade union organisations and, indeed, it is good to see them developing a united stand against the pension changes. However, I would ask whether any of those have have expressed their anger/dismay at the pension changes have responded to the formal DH consultation on pensions which is open until October? I would also respectfully suggest that any union is only as good as its members. Yes, the union leadership have a responsibility to listen to the members but union members also have a duty to make their views known directly within their organisations. The RCN website has requested member views to feed into the consultation. I wonder how many RCN members have done so? Despite the problems being faced by nurses - the pay freeze, increments and pensions under threat, the cost of living increasing etc - I do not see large numbers of nurses turning up to union branch meetings or otherwise participating collectively to oppose the Government and defend our corner. If our voices are loud enough our union leadership will have to listen and that will benefit us all!

  • Comment on: Health unions make plans for pensions walk out

    nhssos's comment 27 August, 2011 8:37 pm

    It is heartening to see nurses becoming concerned about the likely changes to our pensions. The Government is feeding the public lies. There is a surplus in the NHS 'pension pot' which is essentially going into Government coffers. The increases in contributions will mean that nurses and many other workers fund the deficit even further. Hutton has also stated that the cost of public sector pensions will decrease after 2014. The Government clearly do not need to have this fight with NHS staff. Andrew Lansley seems to have grasped this (even if he has not grasped many others) and is reported to be opposed to the ConDEm plans to attack our pensions. I understand that many nurses (amongst others) may be frustrated with their trade union organisations and, indeed, it is good to see them developing a united stand against the pension changes. However, I would ask whether any of those have have expressed their anger/dismay at the pension changes have responded to the formal DH consultation on pensions which is open until October? I would also respectfully suggest that any union is only as good as its members. Yes, the union leadership have a responsibility to listen to the members but union members also have a duty to make their views known directly within their organisations. The RCN website has requested member views to feed into the consultation. I wonder how many RCN members have done so? Despite the problems being faced by nurses - the pay freeze, increments and pensions under threat, the cost of living increasing etc - I do not see large numbers of nurses turning up to union branch meetings or otherwise participating collectively to oppose the Government and defend our corner. If our voices are loud enough our union leadership will have to listen and that will benefit us all!

  • Comment on: Managers back nurse pay freeze deal: have your say

    nhssos's comment 5 January, 2011 7:42 pm

    I am dismayed and angry about the proposed increment freeze. The Letter published in the Health Service Journal and signed by the 12 NHS Chief Executives supporting the increment freeze adds insult to injury. It did, however, set me wondering about how such highly paid individuals could openly and publicly support a Government policy to prevent much lower paid colleagues working in the NHS from getting very small increases in salary, especially in the face of a two year pay freeze, rising fuel costs, VAT increases and higher living costs. I don't know the answer but I do know that these individuals will be cushioned against the impact. Take Mike Farrar, one of the signatories to the letter and Chief Executive, North West Strategic Health Authority, for instance, who is reported to be earning £200-205,000 for the year 2009-10. Another signatory to the same letter, Simon Pleydell, Chief Executive, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is reported to be earning £185-190, 000 for 2009/10. I have no idea whether their salaries (and the other Chief Executives involved) will be curtailed in the coming financial year to help alleviate the national deficit?

  • Comment on: Chiefs declare support for increment freeze

    nhssos's comment 4 January, 2011 9:51 pm

    I am dismayed by the Government plan to freeze increments for nurses. Most nurses are already experiencing a two year pay freeze with surprisingly little reaction. Perhaps nurses have been persuaded by the Coalition's incessant assertions about the 'debt crisis' left by Labour? Perhaps many see the problems experienced in Ireland and worry for the stability of our economy? Nevertheless, enough is enough. In the New Year, we will be faced with VAT increases, energy and fuel bills
    continue to soar and interest rates are predicted to rise. All this against a background in which many senior bankers continue to draw bonuses, utility companies and banks (some of them supposedly nationalised) make huge profits at our expense. Public sector workers -
    nurses, teachers and others - are being made to pay the price for the financial incompetence of bankers and the City of London. I, for one, believe that the RCN must vigorously oppose the increment freeze regardless of any assertions given regarding redundancies. I would be fully prepared to take industrial action in the defence of this cause. There is also an important issue of principle here - that nurses are reasonable people but can be pushed too far!

    As far as the letter signed by the 12 NHS chiefs supporting a freeze on increments is concerned, it is relatively easy to espouse views that support policies that will leave their employees significantly less well off, whilst they themselves are likely to remain financially comfortable!

View all comments