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NICE guidance will help nurses detect child abuse

  • 2 Comments

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence has produced guidelines for nurses and other healthcare staff on how to spot children who may have been abused.

The guidance will allow staff to consider, suspect, or exclude, all forms of maltreatment, including neglect, physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, when treating children.

It provides comprehensive information on the physical and psychological symptoms that may alert healthcare professionals to suspect abuse, and it encourages staff to look at the whole picture surrounding the child to establish whether they suspect maltreatment.

They may have to consider what they hear and see when treating the child, as well as looking at information from other relevant sources.

The NICE guidance is intended to ensure that children who need help get it early in order to prevent future harm, and to make sure that support services are provided to families where they are needed.

The full guidance is available at http://www.nice.org.uk/CG89.

  • 2 Comments

Readers' comments (2)

  • PLEASE LEAVE THE NURSES BE AND LET THEM DO THE JOB THAT IS HARD ENOUGH FOR THEM AS IT IS AND LET THE DOGOODERS MIND THEIR OWN BUISNESS.

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  • In light of previous horrendous cases of abuse that have either gone unnoticed or unaddressed by health professionals, this seems to me, as a children's nurse, sensible and timely advice. Dealing with suspected intentional harm to a child is one of the hardest things a health professional is ever going to deal with and any help, support or advice is to be welcomed. Personally, I am pleased to have these NICE guidelines to refer to, and to know that this difficult issue for nurses and other health care workers is being given the importance it deserves.

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