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NT's Clinical Editor, Emma White introduces the magazine's new clinical section

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VOL: 98, ISSUE: 14, PAGE NO: 33

Emma White, clinical editor, Nursing Times. emma.white@emap.com

NT Clinical has a new look, new title, new aims and a new specially selected clinical advisory group. Nursing is constantly evolving and we will evolve with it. Our revamped clinical pages will give you the latest research in nursing practice, which has real clinical implications, and continue to inform you on the latest developments and innovations from across the UK.

NT Clinical has a new look, new title, new aims and a new specially selected clinical advisory group. Nursing is constantly evolving and we will evolve with it. Our revamped clinical pages will give you the latest research in nursing practice, which has real clinical implications, and continue to inform you on the latest developments and innovations from across the UK.

Change is good, challenging and at times happens rapidly. But cutting-edge knowledge is of little use if it takes months to get into print, so NTClinical will have a rapid turnaround from submission to publication to ensure that information reaches you as quickly as possible.

All our articles are expertly peer reviewed and will provide transferable practice information as well as solid reference materials that you can use on any course you are ever likely to do. Concise abstracts give you a clear summary of the articles and keywords will help with literature searches.

Important subjects will be covered and a range of debate, analysis and opinion will be introduced, with columns written by experts in the field highlighting key issues, controversies and sensitivities surrounding a topic.

This week Professor Rob Newell examines the emotive issue of body image (p36) in a column that accompanies Mark Wareing's reflective case study (p34) on the care of a terminally ill patient who had been profoundly affected by surgery.

All nurses deal with the problem of body image. This may relate to apparently minor issues, such as preoperative shaving, or major issues, such as mastectomy and stoma formation, but they all have a significant impact on patients which is often skimmed over in education.

NTClinical also promises to give you what you often do not have the time to seek out - useful, clinically meaningful articles that are vital to excellent patient care. We receive many submissions on a range of topics and work with authors to ensure that you benefit from their efforts. We also commission experts to write articles so that we can give you the most up-to-date information available.

We welcome your contributions and views, and hope you like our new style and content. If you feel your area of practice is underrepresented, let us know, or better still write an article on it. And if something great is happening in your area of practice, don't keep it to yourself. We hope you like NTClinical and, most importantly, we hope you find it useful.

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