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Nursing strategy drawn up for first time by CCGs

  • 4 Comments

The first ever nursing strategy drawn up by clinical commissioning groups has been published in order to ensure nurses have a say in the shape of services.

A two-year nursing strategy intended to offer local nurses in Leeds a greater say in commissioning decisions has been launched in Leeds.

“GPs have a greater voice than ever and it’s important that nurses are also able to work with their colleagues to shape services”

Ellie Monkhouse

It has been developed by NHS Leeds North Clinical Commissioning Group and NHS Leeds South and East Clinical Commissioning Group.

Ellie Monkhouse, joint director of nursing and quality for both CCGs, said: “With introduction of CCGs, GPs have a greater voice than ever and it’s important that nurses are also able to work with their colleagues to shape services.

“This strategy sets out clearly how we will take nurses to the next level and demonstrates the huge positive difference they and us can make to patient outcomes, care and experience,” she said.

“At the centre of our strategy is the staff commitment to our patients, their families and carers that we deliver quality care with compassion in which our patients can always have confidence,” she added.

The 28-page strategy – Nursing Voice: A vision for the future of nursing from a commissioning perspective 2015-17 – sets out seven broad action areas, covering staffing issues as well as patient care.

 

The strategy focuses on seven areas

  • Helping people to stay independent maximizing wellbeing and improving health outcomes
  • Working with people to provide a positive experience of care
  • Delivering high quality care and measuring impact
  • Building and strengthening leadership
  • Ensuring we have the right staff with right skills in the right place
  • Supportive positive staff experience
  • Celebration

 

More specifically, the strategy also sets out a number of innovative ways in which the two CCGs will deliver primary care and continuing care services.

Nurses with expertise in C difficile will be introduced to provide extra support to care homes and small healthcare providers on education and training in relation to infection control.

The CCG is also working on the development of an online facility for practice nurses to access up to date guidance on clinical skills and competencies. It will also role out an existing practice nurse leadership course to more staff.

Meanwhile, all nurses that work within the CCGs will undertake extra training in dementia to make the workforce “dementia friendly”, in reference to the popular initiative set up by the Alzheimer’s Society.

Other measures include creating a specialist nursing role to contribute to autism diagnosis assessment and follow up care, and nurse support for young carers to ensure their needs are recognised within the planning of the work of the CCG and the safeguarding boards.

 

Measures included in the strategy

  • Providing an Autism diagnostic services – A specialist nursing role to contribute to the assessment and post diagnosis follow up.
  • Nurse support for young carers – incentives to support the young carers within Leeds, and ensure that their needs are recognised within the planning of the work of the CCG and the safeguarding boards.
  • A dementia friendly workforce – All nurses that work within the CCG will undertake extra training in Dementia, with an aim to have all nurses within the CCG to complete the dementia friends training.
  • Introduction of C difficile nurses – to provide extra support nurses and other healthcare professionals in care homes and small providers on education and training in relation to C Diff cases
  • Provision of clinical skills.net – in another first, the CCG continues to work with clinical skills.net to develop a web based facility for practice nurses, to ensure they have up to date guidance on clinical skills and competencies. This will help support revalidation, and provide them with evidence of independent learning.
  • Practice nurse leadership course – Roll out of the city’s already innovative Practice Nurse Leadership course to incorporate management and leadership skills.
  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • michael stone

    I'm not commenting on whether this is 'a good thing' (it probably is), but are these Practice Nurses or Community Nurses ?

    When I ask my CCG (Coventry) questions about Community Nursing, the CCG 'disclaims all responsibility', which it does for most things. For example, when I recently asked the CCG this:

    'Is there any 'advice' (a word I have chosen carefully) for patients, doctors, nurses, the family and lay carers of mentally-incapable patients, and 999 paramedics who are in Coventry, being locally-created in response to the Montgomery ruling ?'

    my CCG sent in answer this:

    'With regards to your [Montgomery] question, it would be the responsibility of the provider organisations to appropriately advise or inform their staff of the outcome of any such rulings.'

    If CCGs simply 'narrowly focus on their commissioning role' it leaves a huge gap which nobody is filling, in terms of 'joining-together the behaviour of local NHS bodies' [so that patients have a coherent experience of care] - that cannot be 'a good thing'.

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  • I'm worried that nurses will only be undertaking dementia friends training. Nurses or client facing staff need training in greater depth than the awareness raising which Dementia Friends is about.

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  • Nurses are needed in every area of health and wellbeing therefore more specialised nurses are needed all over de place with a good balanced of support from the 'team'.
    Specialised nurses still work within a team, and it does not matter how good they are, the strength of work depends on every link in the chain.

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  • In the period after Working for Patients in 1989, some Health Authorities had public health nurses who were Commissioners. Do any nurses in Leeds take commissioning decisions, rather than just making suggestions for potential developments?

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