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Clinical Pocket Guide to Advanced Practice Palliative Nursing

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’I would not recommend this book to the UK reader as many of its references towards medication and diagnostic tools/scales do not reflect what is currently used in England.’

Title: Clinical Pocket Guide to Advanced Practice Palliative Nursing

Edited  by: Constance Dahlin, Patrick J Coyne and Betty R Ferrell

Publisher: Oxford Press 

Reviewer: Jean Kelly, nurse practitioner in palliative care, West Midlands Hospice

What was it like?

Chapters covered were: Pain. Dyspnoea. Bowel symptoms – constipation, diarrhoea and obstruction. Challenging symptoms – dry mouth, hiccups, fevers, pruritus and sleep disorders. Nausea and vomiting. Anxiety. Delerium. Depression and suicide. Palliative emergencies. Discontinuation of life sustaining therapies. Withdrawal of cardiology technology. Withdrawal of respiratory technology. Palliative sedation. Pediatric palliative care across the continuum and Palliative care of the geriatric patient.

The content of the book was very prescriptive and contained an abundance of tables, boxes and lists, which were at times un-necessary and distracting. The medications and dosage recommendations for symptom management were aimed more towards non-UK use as neither the name or dosage, including maximum daily amount correlated with current UK palliative care guidelines. I was also unfamiliar with many of the diagnostic tools/scales mentioned within the book.

Strengths and weaknesses:

All chapters contained variable amounts of useful information however they were written as a series of abrupt statements rather than a format to engage the reader to research the topic further. The inclusion of symptom management for increased respiratory secretions would have been beneficial.

Who should read it:

I would not recommend this book to the UK readers as many of its references towards medication and diagnostic tools/scales do not reflect what is currently used in England.

clinical pocket guide

clinical pocket guide

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