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Evaluating Outcomes in Health and Social Care, 2nd edition

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’As with other books in this series, this will appeal to many professionals who are involved either directly or indirectly with evaluation or outcome measurement.’

Title: Evaluating Outcomes in Health and Social Care, 2nd edition

Authors: Helen Dickinson and Janine O’Flynn

Publisher: Policy Press 

Reviewer: Lynne Partington, project coordinator and specialist advisor, The End of Life Partnership, Cheshire

What was it like?

As one of five books in a series providing an introduction to partnership working in health and social care, this second edition book considers the ”tricky” subject of how outcomes are understood, measured and demonstrated to effectively evaluate partnerships. It covers the subject area from background and policy, latest research, ”hot topics”, frameworks and concepts concluding with recommendations for policy and practice.

What were the highlights?

Like the other books in this series, a real strength is in its use of up to date research and applied practical ideas. It uses both International and UK based evidence and case studies as examples throughout the text to explain some of the difficulties that are experienced not only in evaluation, but when the process is applied to collaborative working.

Strengths and weaknesses?

The book is presented in a clear, logical manner. Concepts are explained well before moving onto the next aspect. For example, the book highlights the focus of different types of evaluation before then clarifying the differences between inputs, outputs and outcomes. Once this has been explained, different forms of outcomes are explored. It is this sequential flow through the subject that makes it easy to follow and understand.

The book has reflective exercises at the end of each section related to the preceding section; these have a strong practice focus to encourage the reader to relate their learning to their own practice. The exercises are broad enough for readers of different backgrounds to utilise.

The book contains many well-presented tables and charts, which are useful to summarise the text, or offer succinct descriptions of the many frameworks introduced in the book.

There are a number of recommendations for policy and practice which are discussed under headings for the most appropriate group, i.e. policy maker, front line services etc.

Who should read it?

As with other books in this series, this will appeal to many professionals who are involved either directly or indirectly with evaluation or outcome measurement. Equally it will appeal to a broader audience who wish to develop or improve their knowledge of the subject.

evaluating outcomes in health and social care 2nd fc

evaluating outcomes in health and social care 2nd fc

 

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