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Hypertension - second editon

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I would recommend this book for any health care professional or student that is going to come across patients with hypertension in their place of work.

Title: Hypertension - second edition

Author: Oxford Cardiology Library

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Reviewer: Jade Day, student nurse at Anglia Ruskin

What was it like?

This book is a nice, compact guide to everything you need to know about hypertension, from the pathophysiology and diagnosis of different types, to the complications that can happen and the management of a patient presenting with hypertension.

What were the highlights?

The book is split into sections, starting with learning about hypertension itself, how it happens and the different types there are. It then looks at investigating and diagnosing and moves onto complications that can arise from having hypertension. The third section is about management and treatment of hypertension covering everything from the patients lifestyle to the pharmacological aspects of treatment. The final section covers special conditions and hypertension including pregnancy, diabetes and old age.

Strengths and Weaknesses?

I really liked the diagrams throughout the book as they give a visual aid to the text you are reading. There is a great list of abbreviations at the beginning, which are helpful to refer to as you go through the book. I like the fact that the chapters are so small because it means that you can look at each section briefly without being too overwhelmed with information. It makes it quite easy to navigate because without these, the sheer amount of information enclosed and the small writing would make this seem difficult to concentrate on. There are a lot of tables and images used throughout that helps break up the text and adds a lot to the overall learning. I felt that it would have been a lot more pleasing to read if there was colour included throughout as everything is grey or black and white and some readers respond better to colour.

Who should read it?

I would recommend this book for any health care professional or student that is going to come across patients with hypertension in their place of work.

hypertension

hypertension

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