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Mosby’s Drug Guide for Nursing Students: Tenth Edition

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Title: Mosby’s Drug Guide for Nursing Students: Tenth Edition

Author: Linda Skidmore-Roth

Publisher: Elsevier 2013

Reviewer: Allison Crocker, theatre practitioner, Poole General Hospital

What was it like?

The book is a comprehensive guide to the full range of drugs in use. As well as the details of individual drugs there is a basic introduction to pharmacology as part of the book adding to the appeal of the book to the student. For each drug listed there is comprehensive coverage including such things as nursing considerations and adverse effects in addition to the action of the drug and conditions for which it may be prescribed. This allows the nurse to be aware of any possible problems and changes to a patient that may occur with a drug. Appendices listing safe injection sites and safe drug administration guidelines also make it an excellent book for the student. This book would allow the student to be confident in the care of a patient who was receiving a medication that they had not encountered before.

Mosby_s_drug_guide_cover

What were the highlights? 

The highlight of the book was the addition of access to a web site that would allow the information to remain up to date.

Strengths & weaknesses:

The strength of the book is its comprehensive coverage of a wide range of medication. Unfortunately it has a major weakness in that, being an American book, some drugs in UK use are not covered and others are described using their US tradename.

Who should read it?

The book will prove ideal for the student operating department practioner or nurse as they orient themselves to a practice environment allowing them to quickly fact check or reaffirm knowledge of a medication they are about to administer. It will also prove useful to newly qualified practitioners as they ease their way from the world of academia to the world of work.

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