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Scattered Minds: The Origins and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder

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’Those interested in genuinely wishing to understand the experiences of anyone affected with ADD/ADHD should read this book, especially practitioners/ specialist in the psychology and mental health field.

Title: Scattered Minds: The Origins and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder

Author: Gabor Matè

Publisher: Vermilion

Reviewer: David Solomon. Senior Lecturer Advanced Nursing Practice/ Postgraduate Researcher. Anglia Ruskin University

What was it like?

A deeply personal narrative that brings to life the daily struggles of the ADHD/ADD child, adult and perspectives of well renowned social science researchers/scientists. These chapters inform the author’s own personal history, myths of ADD and how to approach this condition from a range of perspectives (safely). This being said, in order to treat ADD- it is predominately important to understand the principles of the anatomical, psychological and social views of this disorder- as a potentially reversible impairment. The author further explores the nature of ADD; how the brain develops and roots of ADD in the family that need to be identified in the early developmental stages of life. This book highlights a number of key messages in previous studies of how ADD in children can be managed as ‘It Ain’t Over till It’s Over’.

What were the highlights?

Scattered Minds offers ‘real life’ case studies of people that have presented in clinic, thus, offering insights into the common questions on ADD that arise, for instance. ‘Will my child grow out of ADD?’ Interestingly, a chapter on ‘Many Roads not Travelled’ identifies ADD traits in adolescents namely as ‘inattentive and absentminded’ teens. However, further down the line the realisation that hyperactivity does not require a diagnosis of ADD, however, the individual may experience of this condition as- ‘The only thing that ever slowed me down was the police siren when I was caught speeding’ said a twenty-seven-year-old woman.

Strengths & weaknesses:

A breadth of clinical knowledge and experience offers the practitioner- or student of working with people with ADD a valuable insight on the ‘reality’ of this condition and most importantly how to treat the individual as a whole. The strength of this international bestseller lays with understanding the pathophysiological aspects of the ADD sufferer and the links between childhood- adulthood and the relationships as that may impact the ADD sufferer psychologically.

Who should read it?

Those interested in genuinely wishing to understand the experiences of anyone affected with ADD/ADHD should read this book, especially practitioners/ specialist in the psychology and mental health field.

scattered minds cover

scattered minds cover

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