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The Breast Book

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’The book is aimed at readers aged 10 and upwards but anyone working with children or young people or with an interest in this area could benefit from reading this.’

Title: The Breast Book

Author: Emma Pickett

Publisher: Pinter and Martin Ltd

Reviewer: Rebecca Myatt, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

the breast book jacket

the breast book jacket

What was it like?

Although this book is aimed at younger readers, it has a lot of relevant information for anyone working with pre-teens or the adolescent age group. Written by a former Deputy Head Teacher it aims to demystify breasts in a straightforward manner that is accessible but never patronising. 

There are eight clear, easy to read chapters starting from babyhood then covering development during pre-puberty and adolescence then moving to pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is good discussion of bras, with practical advice as well as personal experiences and an interesting examination of the conflicting attitude of society to breasts which is enlightening as well as reassuring.

What were the highlights?

The bright colours and format of the book make it visually appealing. There are plenty of photographs and drawings, which help to clarify the text. There is also an array of case studies and comments from girls and women, which give a wonderful insight into the perspectives and experiences of other females.

Strengths & weaknesses:

The tone throughout the book is that breasts are your own business, whether it’s wearing a bra, breastfeeding or conforming to expectations. The author is a keen advocate that everyone’s breasts are their own and women should be able to stand up to those who want them to look or act a certain way. The writing style manages to convey assertion without sounding authoritarian or didactic, which makes this a really interesting, enjoyable and thought provoking read.

Who should read it?

The book is aimed at readers aged 10 and upwards but anyone working with children or young people or with an interest in this area could benefit from reading this. 

 

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