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Working In Teams, 2nd edition

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’This book is certainly not just for students and is essential reading for managers, leaders and registered healthcare professionals alike who are developing and working within teams that aspire to embrace collaborative practices and positive team cultures.’

Title: Working In Teams, 2nd edition

Authors: Kim Jelphs, Helen Dickenson, Robin Miller

Publisher: Policy Press University of Bristol

Reviewer: Helen Croft, student mental health nurse, University of Derby

What was it like?

Working In Teams is the 2nd edition of this interesting, practical and accessible book that was first published in 2008. The authors deliver expert knowledge in an engaging format that is able to grab and retain the reader’s attention throughout. The preface is excellent, providing the current context for the need for effective teams and team working practices. Chapter 1 comprehensively provides an introduction in to what teams are and why effective team working matters. Chapters 2 & 3 investigate current research and hot topics while chapter 4 explores useful frameworks and concepts. The final chapter includes recommendations for policy and practices highlighting the need for policy makers, local organisations and front line services to create and nurture the right environments that permit teams to achieve their aims.

What were the highlights?

I particularly enjoyed the chapter 2 ”What does the research tell us?”, which provides an ample debate on the evidence behind teams and team working in practice along with excellent critical analysis. I also found chapter 3 ”Hot topics and emerging issues” stimulating: as a nursing student the focus on emotional labour was particularly illuminating. I found the authors suggestions that teams should provide emotional containment enlightening and also particularly enjoyed the focus on cultures and behaviours and found the topic of communication and information transfer specifically interesting.

Strengths & weaknesses:

This book provides a useful resource that discusses the context and theory behind working in teams from a macro and micro context. The authors provide useful insights and encourages the reader’s participation in exploring this subject through reflective exercises and helpful real life examples. The authors acknowledge that this text cannot comprehensively cover the subject, but I liked its size and they usefully direct the reader to further literature and resources at the end of each chapter but also provide a complete reference list and helpfully an index too.

Who should read it?

This book will prove to be a useful resource for nursing and allied healthcare students. However, this book is certainly not just for students and is essential reading for managers, leaders and registered healthcare professionals alike who are developing and working within teams that aspire to embrace collaborative practices and positive team cultures.

working in teams

working in teams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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