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EDITOR’S COMMENT

'Nurses have earned their royal recognition'

  • 4 Comments

This week is pretty busy in Nursing Times HQ. The biggest-ever Nursing Times Awards are being held at The
Grosvenor tonight, and we also have the huge honour of being able to take our finalists for those awards to Clarence House to meet HRH The Prince of Wales - another first.

He has shown great enthusiasm for nursing and compassion, and is eager to meet our shortlisted entrants and learn more about their projects. To find out more about his interest in the profession - and his evident respect for it - please see the article he has written especially for us to commemorate this occasion on page 7.

It is a huge coup for our shortlisted nurses and Nursing Times to gain such high-profile attention. And it’s utterly deserved. Our winners and finalists have worked hard and shown phenomenal expertise, innovative skill and passion for patient care to get a place on our roll of honour.

Nursing can boast of having a huge impact on the quality of patient care and safety - yet it rarely does. So it is right we shout about its achievements from the rooftops

This is a profession that can boast of having a huge impact on the quality of patient care and safety - yet it rarely does. So it is right that we get to shout about its achievements from the rooftops. Some may believe that nursing doesn’t care and is in crisis. The truth is far from that bleak picture - I have the evidence base.

The awards are a testimony to nurses’ commitment to improve standards. But they aren’t the only evidence I can marshall.

Last week, I was at a caremakers’ event in Leeds, and saw the enthusiasm for improving NHS care from both qualified and student nurses. The profession is filled with people who know that “OK” is not good enough and want to do better and better.

One of the caremakers - nurse Stuart Young - pointed out the importance of celebrating success. This can be done not just in a high-profile way such as at the Nursing Times Awards, but with colleagues, each day, pointing out what has been done well and praising those who have been responsible for such good care.

The media, the profession, the government and various experts have devoted so much time this year to analysing what has gone wrong with the NHS that they seem to have forgotten that you can learn as much from what has gone right.

Yes - we need to know how to avoid repeating the failures. But we also need to know how to celebrate the successes.

So think about what you do well and, more importantly, think about how you can do more of it.

Congratulations to all our Awards finalists - and to all of you who are providing top-quality care, every shift, every day.

Jenni Middleton, editor

jenni.middleton@emap.com. Follow me on Twitter @nursingtimesed

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • Scenes from a play called National Health has been chosen in the National Theatre's 50th birthday on BBC2 to show how important nurses are

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  • Is that the play you wrote dave?

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  • Na
    This was written in the 60s by someone else
    It was all about too few nurses and budget cuts!

    The fact that out of all the plays the National does annually, this was chosen means Nurses are important.

    My play called "Nursing in the 21st Century" is all about an incident seen through different Nurses' eyes. Its also about bullying and "Nurses eat their own young"

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  • Na
    This was written in the 60s by someone else
    It was all about too few nurses and budget cuts!

    The fact that out of all the plays the National does annually, this was chosen means Nurses are important.

    My play called "Nursing in the 21st Century" is all about an incident seen through different Nurses' eyes. Its also about bullying and "Nurses eat their own young"

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

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