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THE BIG QUESTION

The big question: why is nursing becoming more stressful?

  • 8 Comments

More than 60% of nurses say they have suffered the side-effects of work-related stress, such as physical or mental health problems in the past year.


Two-thirds also warn that their ward or team is regularly short staffed and most nurses report that they are under more pressure than they were 12 months ago, according to the findings from our latest annual survey on the state of nursing.

Your comment could be published in Nursing Times.

  • 8 Comments

Readers' comments (8)

  • michael stone

    Just a guess from an outsider - but could it be that 'the system' is trying to squeeze staff 'until the pips squeak' to get the absolute maximum amount of work [or, as finance managers might see, 'return on expenditure] out of them ?

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  • not only at work but university nursing students also look stressed as well.. I can see that from my daughter and her friends

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  • AUSTERITY
    Forced Privatisation
    The staff in the NHS suffer as nursing is not attracting people due to wage freeze and headlines like these. Unless they are from another european country or further afield.
    Existing staff as Michael suggests are then expected to work longer hours more days/shifts, meet targets set by politicians knowing they will fail (more evidence for privatisation). A pay increase of 1%; is
    below the level of inflation and has existed since this Governemnt came into power and is now taking wages into a loss of salary in real terms compared to the increased productivity expected.
    These changes exist upon all of the local reorganisation of services to try and manage the changes from DoH, costing and savings from austerity measures that have not had time to be embedded.
    ................................and breathe

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  • michael stone

    About a week ago, a consultant medic sent me an e-mail (and we were discussing a different issue - so this was by way of 'contributory background information') which started, with a comment about how busy NHS clinicians are:

    'In essence, most frontline doctors and nurses are snowed under with numerous demands on their time.
    Hospitals are hugely pressurised both at front and back door, with
    increasingly sick patients, local authorities have been savagely cut,
    impacting on social care, mental health and primary care services are
    grossly underfunded. GPs are seeing 30 to 40 people a day alongside all the administration and the retiring GP workforce hasnt been
    adequately replaced. Hospitals like my own are routinely seeing 250 to 300 people in A&E each 24 hours and admitting around 90 of them. Staff have lots of regulatory and performance and financial pressures, their own revalidation, appraisal to consider and sometimes have to deal
    with very unhappy patients/families/complaints etc.'

    That does look 'quite stressful' ?

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  • michael stone | 16-Dec-2014 1:37 pm

    very constructive commentary from somebody, like much of the public, who has no idea what the work entails! there are other mags with a different and non-professional readership which may welcome and be enlightened by this vacuous type of commentary.

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  • michael stone

    The comment was from a consultant medic - I simply posted it.

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  • michael stone | 17-Dec-2014 9:36 am

    that was understood. you already said so. my comment still stands! there are plenty of websites such as the health section of national newspapers for you to post your vacuous comments on.

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  • I agree with Michael and yes if he wants to post it here, I don't mind. I have just left the NHS after nearly 20 years of service. The frozen pay, unpaid expected overtime day in and day out is physically untenable. There are not enough hours in the day to achieve all the demands we are expected to do. The reality is the NHS does not have the resources or the money to deal with the number of people using it. Certainly it will be largely privatised as it cannot carry on the way its going. Every working person should have private insurance and they should be given a big discount on their national insurance payments for not using the NHS when they are ill.

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