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Patient-focused service rules ok

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VOL: 98, ISSUE: 10, PAGE NO: 47

HAZEL ROLLINS, MSC, RN, RM, nutrition nurse specialist, Luton and Dunstable Hospital NHS Trust

The articles in this nutrition supplement are incredibly varied in scope. Osteoporosis is a growing public health issue and is discussed by Anne Sutcliffe. High technology health care is addressed in the paper on home parenteral nutrition and individualised care is covered in the paper by Hall et al. Clearly nutrition is an issue for us all, and this supplement should contain something for all of us.

The articles in this nutrition supplement are incredibly varied in scope. Osteoporosis is a growing public health issue and is discussed by Anne Sutcliffe. High technology health care is addressed in the paper on home parenteral nutrition and individualised care is covered in the paper by Hall et al. Clearly nutrition is an issue for us all, and this supplement should contain something for all of us.

In the final article in her three-part series, Anne Sutcliffe discusses treatments for osteoporosis. As the number of older people grows, osteoporosis is becoming more widespread. However, there is also a growing range of treatment options available, which are discussed and clarified in this article.

Patricia Hall et al discuss work with one patient with severe learning disabilities which demonstrated that he was capable of making choices and expressing preferences for different foods when given the opportunity to do so. The challenge to outmoded traditional patterns of care where food choices are lacking are obvious. How can this work be extended in an environment where resources are often limited? How are nurses improving the nutritional care of patients with learning disabilities? Let us know what you are doing. We'd be delighted to hear from you.

The vision encapsulated in the managed clinical network for home parenteral nutrition in Scotland, described by Jan Tait and Janet Baxter, is truly inspired. It clearly demonstrates team-working and sharing best practice. Home parenteral nutrition can be hazardous in the hands of inexperienced staff, yet here non-specialist centres are supported in providing care. The patients are thus protected from the so-called 'post-code lottery' in health care, while the staff are enabled to learn new skills in a safe environment. This is a patient-focused service underpinned by a strong emphasis on evidence, standards and sharing. It enables patients to live at home who would previously have required prolonged hospital stays or multiple admissions. I wish it every success and look forward to hearing results in the future.

- The third article in the series on diet and metabolism will appear in the next NTplus Nutrition Supplement on August 22.

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