Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Review of mental health nursing

  • Comment
A review of mental health nursing was published in April 2006 by England’s chief nursing officer Christine Beasley as a plan to develop this branch of nursing between now and 2016.

It was the first such review for 10 years and considered to be long overdue for the profession.

A year in the making, the review has 17 recommendations based on three themes – improving outcomes for service users, developing a positive role for nurses by modernising them, and putting value into practice.

For improving outcomes for service users, it says nurses should take a holistic approach to care and ensure their clients receive better physical care and improved access to talking therapies, while trusts must provide more psychological therapies and ensure nurses are trained to provide them.

For delivering positive roles and a modern profession, the document says this will require local trusts to review career structures and develop a range of new nursing roles by extending practice and to support nurse prescribing.

For putting value into practice, the review says nurses should use the recovery approach in every aspect of their practice to ensure that all care aims are meaningful to service users and to promote social inclusion for both clients and users.

The ideas are laudable, but they leave it up to local trusts to implement the recommendations as they want to, rather than having to meet set national targets, which some nurses fear could undermine the review’s good intentions.

There is no specific cash to back the recommendations, although the government argues that they would not require large cash investment. The review group set up by the CNO to do this work will carry out a follow-up review in two years’ time to see what has changed.

The Scottish Executive also published (on the same day) its mental health nursing review, which has a far more prescriptive tone and gives key dates and targets for implementation.

Issues that mental health nurses have identified as needing attention for some time include more resources to increase staffing and improve estates; overhaul of training with a greater focus on practical clinical skills; better mentoring and preceptorship; less bureaucracy and paperwork; greater inter-agency working; more user involvement in service design; and clearer career structure.

It is unclear whether all of these issues are fully addressed by the CNO’s review.

From Values to Action: The Chief Nursing Officer’s Review of Mental Health Nursing can be seen at www.dh.gov.uk

Updated: September 2006

Review of mental health nursing

A review of mental health nursing was published in April 2006 by England’s chief nursing officer Christine Beasley as a plan to develop this branch of nursing between now and 2016.

It was the first such review for 10 years and considered to be long overdue for the profession.

A year in the making, the review has 17 recommendations based on three themes – improving outcomes for service users, developing a positive role for nurses by modernising them, and putting value into practice.

For improving outcomes for service users, it says nurses should take a holistic approach to care and ensure their clients receive better physical care and improved access to talking therapies, while trusts must provide more psychological therapies and ensure nurses are trained to provide them.

For delivering positive roles and a modern profession, the document says this will require local trusts to review career structures and develop a range of new nursing roles by extending practice and to support nurse prescribing.

For putting value into practice, the review says nurses should use the recovery approach in every aspect of their practice to ensure that all care aims are meaningful to service users and to promote social inclusion for both clients and users.

The ideas are laudable, but they leave it up to local trusts to implement the recommendations as they want to, rather than having to meet set national targets, which some nurses fear could undermine the review’s good intentions.

There is no specific cash to back the recommendations, although the government argues that they would not require large cash investment. The review group set up by the CNO to do this work will carry out a follow-up review in two years’ time to see what has changed.

The Scottish Executive also published (on the same day) its mental health nursing review, which has a far more prescriptive tone and gives key dates and targets for implementation.

Issues that mental health nurses have identified as needing attention for some time include more resources to increase staffing and improve estates; overhaul of training with a greater focus on practical clinical skills; better mentoring and preceptorship; less bureaucracy and paperwork; greater inter-agency working; more user involvement in service design; and clearer career structure.

It is unclear whether all of these issues are fully addressed by the CNO’s review.

From Values to Action: The Chief Nursing Officer’s Review of Mental Health Nursing can be seen at www.dh.gov.uk

Updated: September 2006

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.