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Paediatric nurses honoured at compassionate care awards

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A group of paediatric nurses and doctors who support young patients to learn about their bloods by spending the day in a haematology laboratory are among the winners of this year’s Kate Granger Compassionate Care Awards.

They won the team award for the initiative – called Harvey’s Gang – which was set up at Western Sussex Hospitals Foundation Trust by its chief biomedical scientist Malcolm Robinson with the team, so that children could learn more about how blood testing works.

The awards, now in their second year, were set up by terminally ill hospital consultant Kate Granger to recognise excellence in the NHS.

They were born out of Dr Granger’s #hellomynameis campaign, which encourages staff to introduce themselves to patients.

“This year’s winners all demonstrate amazing attributes individually but with one central figure of a truly person –centred approach to care”

Kate Granger

Other award winners announced at NHS England’s Health and Care Innovation Expo 2015 in Manchester included healthcare assistant Lydia Jackson for her care of a patient with an extensive fungating lesion to his face, following radiotherapy.

Ms Jackson, who works for Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, won the individual award for her “compassionate and excellent interpersonal skills” which enabled her to develop a therapeutic relationship with the patient, who lives alone and in poor circumstances.

Meanwhile, Aneurin Bevan University Health Board won the organisation award for its work with charity the NHS Retirement Fellowship to offer support to patients living in nursing homes and identify good practice.

“These awards epitomise the exceptional care and compassion that is present in our NHS and other healthcare providers”

Danny Mortimer

The Care Home ‘Ask and Talk’ service they run is manned by volunteer, retired NHS staff who speak to residents to identify where improvements can be made. A local web-based feedback system has also been introduced.

NHS Employers, which jointly organises the awards with NHS England, received almost 100 entries this year.

Danny Mortimer, chief executive of NHS Employers, said: “These awards epitomise the exceptional care and compassion that is present in our NHS and other healthcare providers and the winners should be incredibly proud of their contribution.”

Dr Granger said: “I am incredibly proud of the legacy the Kate Granger awards will create towards celebrating a culture of outstanding compassionate care. This year’s winners all demonstrate amazing attributes individually but with one central figure of a truly person –centred approach to care.”

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