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Depression major problem for nursing home residents

  • 9 Comments

Depression is a “major health problem” among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment, especially younger residents, according to Norwegian researchers writing online in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

They said: “Nursing home staff should communicate with and observe residents closely for signs of depression, especially younger residents with high dependence on activities of daily living.”

They assessed 227 patients, aged from 65 to 102, at 30 nursing homes.

  • 9 Comments

Readers' comments (9)

  • That they are depressed surprises you how?

    1. They have been moved from their own home and family

    2 They are in a new surrounding with stangers

    3. They had to let go of lot of their possesions

    need i go on.

    We all know that moving is one of the greater causes of depression and stress.

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  • why doesn't somebody take some action instead of reproducing the same old obvious stories in the media year in year out. it makes extremely boring and frustrating, highly depressing, stressful and anxiolytic reading and the money spent on such research and reporting could be better spent on making improvements.

    Is it merely a way making money for the media and possibly the researchers through sensationalist scaremongering?

    It is depressing enough on retirement worring that one might end up in one of these homes of hell.

    Given the right environment with adequate facilities and care which is properly managed, with enough choice of suitable activities to motivate residents in an old peoples' home could potentially be a positive experience. They should be run more on the lines of a high quality hotel and feel like home from home.

    If the authorities in Britain are so thick they should look to some of the better homes in Europe for examples.

    Staff should be highly trained in gerontology which is a motivating, challenging and interesting area with possibilites of CPD and attractive employment conditions so that the can enjoy providing the highest standards of care in a congenial enviroment for all concerned and adequate support to those with a predisposition to clinical depression.

    The current situation in many of the homes often only serves to exacerbate this condition instead of helping to prevent it.

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  • The main stumbling block to highly trained , motivated, well managed staff,appropriate activities etc is of course funding. The opportunities for CPD vary widely and depend on the individuals level of self motivation, dedication, the ability(and desire) to be able to self fund.
    Wages paid for working in a care enviroment are minimal, the adage," you get what you pay for" springs to mind. Of course ther are well furnished, well staffed stimulating care homes but these often come with a substantial top up fee as council funding for residential care is simply not enough for even the most well meaning of care home owners/managers to provide the staff to prevent the obvious; depressed residents who live there.

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  • lack of funding is a very weak argument and just adds to the complacency of those involved with managing the care of the elderly, especially at government and local government level. Allocation of funding is important in providing the necessary care for the elderly.

    A model for the care of the elderly and how it is to be funded needs to be established nationwide. Homes then need to decided on the staffing levels and skill mix they need and the costs. They then need to offer CPD which is adapted to their model and needs of the patients. There is no use nurses going off on any privately funded course of their choice willy nilly just to collect certificates and fill up their log book as these are of varying standards and use to their workplace and risk wasting financial resources of the home for their time off.

    It is high time that this whole problematic was approaced in a systematic way so that more lives are not affected.

    What is wrong with nurses intersted in the are of the elderly studying Gerontology before going on to chose a specialty, of which there are many in care of the elderly ,and then doing CPD courses offered by their home to suit the needs of the residents in their workplace.

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  • lack of funding is a very weak argument and just adds to the complacency of those involved with managing the care of the elderly, especially at government and local government level. Allocation of funding is as important in providing the necessary care for the elderly as it is in any other area of public service.

    A model for the care of the elderly and how it is to be funded needs to be established nationwide. Homes then need to decided on the staffing levels and skill mix they need and the costs. They then need to offer CPD which is adapted to their model and needs of the patients. There is no use nurses going off on any privately funded course of their choice willy nilly just to collect certificates and fill up their log books as these are of varying standards and use to their workplace and risk wasting financial resources of the home for their time off.

    It is high time that this whole problematic was approaced in a systematic way so that more lives are not affected.

    What is wrong with nurses intersted in the area of the elderly studying Gerontology before going on to chose a specialty, of which there are many in care of the elderly,and then doing CPD courses offered by their home to suit the needs of the residents in their workplace.

    It is a complete and utter disgrace that any individual in Britain, a member of G8, is treated in this uncivilised and undignified way. there are no excuses. it is a matter of attitude which many other European countries manage perfectly adequately and without issue.

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  • This is a Norwegian study and is about depression in residents not funding for the care home system. Your idea of all nurses studying Gerontology is commendable but idealistic.

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  • Fine if the services for the elderly in the UK are to remain in the dark ages. Reforms are urgently needed right across the board to cope with current and future changing needs of an increasing ageing population and this requires foresight, planning and adequate funding. An environment and staff fit for purpose are essential to provide good and appropriate care.

    Gerontology is only way forward to provide expertise in the increasingly complex care needs of the elderly and this is recognised by other European countries who are motivated to provide state of the art care.

    There is no room for complacency in British nursing care for any group of patients.

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  • They said: “Nursing home staff should communicate with and observe residents closely for signs of depression, especially younger residents with high dependence on activities of daily living.”

    why do qualified and registered nurses in Britain need a research report to tell them to do what is part of their job?

    if they do observe signs of depression what are they going to do about it? there are many causes of depression some of which are cited in the first post above. other causes could be sudden and forced change in lifestyle and routine, change of social environemnt, change of diet, the environment and level of care offered by the home which may not suit the individual and their needs, or may be totally inadequate as in some recent media reports.

    is the nurse going to report to the doctor who systematically prescribes antidepressives according to some protocol and guidelines without understanding the needs of the patient which may only exacerbate the condition or cause total apathy, or improve the envronment and level of care, tailormake activities to the needs and taste of the patient to motive and mobilise them according to their ability, make sure that their level of activity and rest during the day suits them and is not reduced to just one hour of an activity in which they may have little interest, make sure the person and their level of independence and abilities are respected, take time to listen to all their concerns and help find solutions to them, etc., etc.

    it needs energetic, enthusiastic, motivated and highly trained staff in different aspects of care of the elderly and adequate facilities and financial resources.
    there is no place for homes in old houses which have been 'adapted' and employ poorly trained staff who let the patients sit around all day and just feed, wash, toilet and bed them and sometimes very poorly. no wonder the residents, and some of the staff as well, get depressed! some, but not all, of these staff are kind and well-meaning but unable to deliver professional care.

    Given the right facilities and resources which include staff training which is focussed on their care group, looking after the elderly can be a wonderfully rewarding profession.

    Maybe gerontological nursing should be a separate field like mental health and paediatrics, for university graduates or a postgraduate option. only then should they be qualified to go on to work in services for the elderly, or care homes with the support of trained and certified associate practitioners and healthcare assistants who also have training in care of the elderly and their basic needs and specialist areas as necessary such as occupational therapy, psychotherapy, basic care, dementia, etc.

    there is no place in this highly complex and specialised area of care for entrepreneurs, matrons of doubtful and out of date qualifications and poorly trained staff or trained nurses who have received no specialist training in and have little understanding of the care of the elderly or facilities which are totally inadequate often adapted from old houses. such poor adaptations also lead to poor care caused by staff fatigue such too many stairs for wheelchairs, small and badly designed bathrooms, bedrooms, etc.

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  • there are many good models for care of the elderly, mainly in other countries. why can't these be adopted nationally in britain too?

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