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Making lectures more engaging

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Article:

Innes G, Main M (2013) Improving learning with personal response systems. Nursing Times; 109: 13, 20-22.

Authors:

Gavin Innes is e-learning adviser at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Aberdeen; Martyn Main is senior nurse educator at Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.

 

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • How a personal response system can aid learning for nursing and midwifery students
  • Limitations of PRS use
  • Suggestions for future research into PRS

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

Nurse education and how to improve concentration in lectures. This article sets out the strengths and limitations of implementing this novel approach to lectures and explores how nursing and midwifery students, in particular, can benefit.

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

In addition to supplementing any research you may be doing on nurse education, this article may be useful for you when assessing and evaluating your own course. PRS could be something you might want to suggest to your university for future lectures.

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

Have you ever used a personal response system in lectures?

Do you find the “novelty factor” of using props helps with concentration?

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