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Student video promotes understanding between nurses and patients

  • 5 Comments

A group of nursing students have made a video to promote collaboration between nurses and patients, and emphasise that clinicians are “human too”.

The six first-year students on Northumbria University’s nursing studies (learning disabilities) degree created the film after being challenged to answer the question “what is nursing?”.

They spoke with patients and nurses to try and gain an understanding of what patients felt they needed from nurses, and vice versa. Both groups said that they wanted to see displays of patience, humour, communication, honesty, understanding and a smile.

“We hope that it will make people see that we, as nurses, are human too”

Louise Vallery

The film shows the students undertaking varying roles including caring for a child with cancer and a confused patient with dementia, as well as expressing how emotionally challenging a career in nursing can be. It has already been viewed more than 2,000 times on YouTube.

Louise Vallery, one of the students who made the film, said: “We developed the campaign after seeing a need to encourage a mutual understanding between patients and nurses.

“We wanted to bridge a perceived gap and reassure the public that, as nurses, we share in their emotions, from joy to sadness and frustration,” she said.

“We’ve been so excited with the response we’ve had from those who have seen the film, and we hope that it will make people see that we, as nurses, are human too,” she added.

Along with Ms Vallery, the other students involved in the production of the film were Jennifer Finley, Billy Irvine, Diane Malaugh, Rachael Scott and Emily Wrightson.

University of Northumbria

A group of students have made a video about nursing

Mark Robinson, director of programmes in Northumbria University’s department of health and wellbeing, said: “Having a true understanding of what it means to be a nurse, and what nursing is, is a crucial factor for our first year students who are embarking on this career.” 

The students have been invited to share their work at the annual Positive Choices conference for those working in learning disabilities nursing, which is being held in Cardiff on 16-17 April.

  • 5 Comments

Readers' comments (5)

  • michael stone

    It certainly doesn't help, if clinicians and laymen do not see each other as 'human beings'. The main barrier, so far as I can see, is that most laymen 'rely on 'common sense' and 'instinct'' while many professionals are much more affected [in terms of their behaviour and beliefs] by 'guidance and rules'.

    To some laymen, 'professionals following [badly-fitting for the particular situation] guidance' looks like 'tick-box idiocy, totally lacking in common sense'.

    To some professionals, whose experience and training means they now 'behave the expert way' and no longer 'the instinctive way', some behaviour by the laymen 'can look strange and suspicious'.

    So this makes sense to me:

    'Louise Vallery, one of the students who made the film, said: “We developed the campaign after seeing a need to encourage a mutual understanding between patients and nurses.'

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  • michael stone | 13-Apr-2015 2:35 pm

    go down the market and hire a few who will use common sense and instinct to look after patients and save your money at the same time. in your book, apparently a life long career of observation and gaining a wide span of experience and investment in our basic training and higher education with courses and endless hours of practice to learn all the skills of reflective practice and analysis of the world's best evidence, the finer art and psychology of complex interpersonal relations, dealing with a very wide range of individuals and different clinical situations and decision making drawing on a very extensive knowledge base to which we have all contributed seems to you an utter waste! we are just robots totally devoid of common sense and relying on intuitive thought if you say so. who do you think makes many of these guidelines to follow and how? if you believe all we do is blindly follow them far few patients would survive but unfortunately many have had to be introduced so there is some consistency in our work, a more effective communication tool for interdisciplinary teams and frequent change overs of staff 24/7 and because of a hypercritical, complaining and litigious public and also because they are often imposed by lay management who fail to understand the needs of patients, their clinical needs and what actually comprises a clinical role and professional autonomy and according to our code of ethics and conduct! bye, I'm off to leave place for your lay folk who are bound to make a better and cheaper job of it all even if the patients fail to thrive - enjoy! oh and don't bother to reply to me, I am not in the least interested in your repeated vacuous and naïve commentary on things you do not understand.

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  • michael stone

    Anonymous | 13-Apr-2015 8:10 pm

    I didn't mean to say that the laymen and the professionals will usually be at loggerheads - I meant that WHEN THEY ARE IN DISPUTE 'The main barrier, so far as I can see, is that most laymen 'rely on 'common sense' and 'instinct'' while many professionals are much more affected [in terms of their behaviour and beliefs] by 'guidance and rules'.

    Why did you put 'unfortunately' in your '... but unfortunately many have had to be introduced ...' ?

    As for 'who do you think makes many of these guidelines to follow and how?', usually the authors are identified. But I would be very interested to have a word with whomever came up with this particular 'rule or guidance', which recently cropped up on Dignity in Care (Liz is one of the people who runs the website):

    DOLs
    11/04/15 - 21:05
    Liz Taylor
    Via the website in box -My name is Jo I'm a care manager of a small residential home recently I have discovered a moral issue regarding dols authorisation , I fully agree with the authorisations as it is also a benefit to track service users who are in care with no family as they are having a review annually which before dols they would have not . My moral issue is that if you have a dols you can not have a statement of intent . A statement of intent in place would ensure that person could receive end of life care at home now we don't have statement of intent it gives a grey area yes we can have a best interest meeting but if for some reason you ring the out of hours g.p it can have a different effect statement of intent mentioned to the out of hours says exactly what it is. Out of hours g.p are very unlikely to send anyone to hospital with a statement of intent best interest is different . Explaining to a family member that police will attend when their loved one passes causes emotional distress this distress is passed on to the loved one

    Any thoughts

    I pointed out that I wasn't sure what a 'statement of intent' is, and Jo e-mailed me:

    'Statement of intent is put in place by g.p when they expect someone to pass within two weeks it is renewed if needs be . Since dols have been introduced you can't have statement of intent if dols in place.'


    Now, it would have been a PROFESSIONAL who came up with 'you can't have statement of intent if dols in place'.

    DoLS is either a mental capacity or a mental health issue - this 'statement of intent' is a certification/verification of death operational device, and as such it is linked to how likely the patient is to die: there is NO LOGICAL CONNECTION between DoLS and certification/verification.

    As I've got some free online time, I'll comment in brackets about your post.


    go down the market and hire a few who will use common sense and instinct to look after patients and save your money at the same time (not worthy of a comment) . in your book, apparently a life long career of observation and gaining a wide span of experience and investment in our basic training and higher education with courses and endless hours of practice to learn all the skills of reflective practice and analysis of the world's best evidence, the finer art and psychology of complex interpersonal relations, dealing with a very wide range of individuals and different clinical situations and decision making drawing on a very extensive knowledge base to which we have all contributed seems to you an utter waste! (no, it isn't a waste - but being a professional, does not invariably mean that you 'are right about everything'. But professionals do tend towards a common position about 'what is right'.). we are just robots totally devoid of common sense (no, you are not 'just robots devoid of sense': although 'what makes sense' depends on 'who is doing the thinking') and relying on intuitive thought (I said that the laymen, are the people who go with 'intuition') if you say so. who do you think makes many of these guidelines to follow and how? if you believe all we do is blindly follow them far few patients would survive but unfortunately many have had to be introduced so there is some consistency in our work, a more effective communication tool for interdisciplinary teams and frequent change overs of staff 24/7 (yes, some guidance is necessary for that purpose, and it will usually, but NOT INVARIABLY, make things better when followed) and because of a hypercritical, complaining and litigious public (that is a poor reason for the introduction of most guidance) and also because they are often imposed by lay management (most of the guidance I'm bothered by, is written by clinical organisations/bodies, but some of it has got input from coroners) who fail to understand the needs of patients, their clinical needs (you know your management - I don't) and what actually comprises a clinical role and professional autonomy and according to our code of ethics and conduct! bye, I'm off to leave place for your lay folk who are bound to make a better and cheaper job of it all even if the patients fail to thrive - enjoy! oh and don't bother to reply to me, I am not in the least interested in your (I'd spotted that) repeated vacuous and naïve commentary on things you do not understand (whether or not I understand what I comment on, is something we clearly disagree about).

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  • 'Louise Vallery, one of the students who made the film, said: “We developed the campaign after seeing a need to encourage a mutual understanding between patients and nurses.

    “We wanted to bridge a perceived gap and reassure the public that, as nurses, we share in their emotions, from joy to sadness and frustration,” she said.'

    Well done student nurses!


    Anonymous | 13-Apr-2015 8:10 pm

    'hypercritical, complaining and litigious public'. That's not how the student nurses see their patients, thank goodness.

    I hope I never work with you or are cared for you, with that view of patients. Disgraceful attitude.

    No comment on the article I see, just the usual rant. Ever thought of being a comedian?

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  • michael stone

    Anonymous | 13-Apr-2015 8:10 pm

    This (the ongoing interchanges between me and 'my follower(s)') is 'getting silly' - but there doesn't seem to be a solution.

    Off-topic, I do wonder if there would be less 'bickering' if everyone had to post with a username - although, I'm not sure if so many people would still post, if they had to do that.

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