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Consultants 'will require more overtime pay'

  • 21 Comments

Plans to ramp up commercialisation in the NHS will lead to more money being paid out in overtime as trusts are unable to plan for the future, consultants have warned.

The advice comes after the BBC reported that some consultants are earning more than £100,000 a year in overtime payments on top of their normal salary and bonuses.

There is no set rate, but senior doctors are often paid around £600 for working four extra hours. The average annual salary of a full-time consultant in the UK currently stands at nearly £90,000. This pays for 10 blocks of four hours a week.

Trusts that want consultants to work beyond that point frequently pay between £500 and £700 for four-hour sessions, according to documents seen by the BBC.

Dr Ian Wilson, deputy chairman of the BMA’s Consultants Committee, said: “The fact is that this happens because trusts can’t plan for the future - a situation which will get much worse as the government’s NHS white paper seeks to marketise healthcare even more - and so have to bring in extra help as a quick fix when things get desperate.

He also added that the payments are usually made to hard-pressed specialists who are already overstretched.

 

  • 21 Comments

Readers' comments (21)

  • And I bet they'll get it too! See what an effective, strong union and a powerful workforce gets you? Nurses take note!

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  • What will happen is the targets will be scrapped and therefore no overtime will be needed to achieve these targets. Management organisation is an issue here as well as the lack of consultants coming through the system or employed.
    However I agree with Mike, the unions for medics have real power not a 'please sir' power.
    RCN good job but now beef it up. We want stronger still.

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  • Here here hospitals use CNS to do the OPD work and then constantly hound them to do more work . Nurses are treated like doctors when the trust want extra money OP wk and idiots(or schoolchildren )when we are asked to do extra for no increase of pay and certainly no overtime payments. Nurses are doing NMP courses and Masters degrees and people outside the NHS laugh as to why we are doing this without any rewards for our efforts especially when we study in our own time and often finance courses .

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  • Anonymous | 15-Jan-2011 1:28 pm

    I am interested in your comments as I wonder whether it might be an employment and salary issue that nurses are doing courses which are not solicited by the NHS which may explain why they are not, in many cases, being renumerated for their extra qualifications and experience. Do employers want nurses with higher qualifications, and above all do they want to pay for them? It seems to me that there is little use in going off and getting further qualifications (apart from benefits to yourself, your patients and your team) when these are not acknowledged by some employers.
    My experience of this is after a long period abroad, then a UK MSc in healthcare management and the hope of a job in the NHS or private sector as an RN employers simply weren't interested in offering me a job on the wards or in management and only wanted newly qualified nurses who are far cheaper to employ and don't expect to stay in the same job forever so that there is a quicker turnover. But after 20 years in general medicine and an MSc I was not prepared to start at the bottom again and with a newly qualified starting salary. Also newly qualified nurses are expected by employers to question authority less than more experienced staff, although I expect this is now less the case.

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  • In A & E we have consultants on the shop floor, 2 work, the others walk around delegating jobs giving others more work but seldom touch a pt. So why pay them overtime. if we are talking about freezing salaries they should set an example. I admit I do no other A & E where consultants do work on the shop floor. But why can't they do shifts like us, out of hours is when there is more need of expert support.

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  • HERE HERE WELL SAID ANON 4.05PM
    WHEN WILL THEY (THE CONSULTANTS) COME INTO THE REAL WORLD YES THEY SHOULD DO SHIFTS YES THEY SHOULD WORK AT THE WEEK END HOW MANY TIMES TILL SOME ONE SOME WHERE HAS AN A EPHINAY MOMENT AND THINK THE NHS IS 24 HOURs SERVICE NOT A MON TO FRI SERVICE AS CONSULTANTS APPEAR TO UNDERSTAND NO WONDER THEY CONTRIBUTE TO THE DOWNFALL OF THE SERVICE, WHAT NICE LITTLE EARNER 7OO POUNDS FOR APPROX 4 HOURS WORK ITS A DISGRACE
    ANY WONDER THE GENERAL PUBLIC HAVE LOST FAITH
    I TRULY WISH I WAS YOUNG ENOUGH TO EMIGRATE


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  • My concern is not how much overtime or how much money Consultants make because like any other part of the NHS they are some Consultants who are worth every penny they earn and some are not. However when it comes to paying nurses overtime some Trusts are ever so reluctant to do so bearing in mind nurses stay behind and do work without even claiming for the extra hours they put in on a weekly basis.

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  • Devide and rule story approved by the conservative health secetary and the private health insurers bankrolling his office.

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  • Anonymous | 16-Jan-2011 0:34 am I have to agree, I do not begrudge the consultants (or any Doctor) the pay or conditions they get, but I do argue vehemently that the gap in pay and conditions between Doctors and Nurses should be considerably shortened. I mean, just look at a senior Doctor on an A&E department and a senior Nurse on an A&E department, is there really any difference in stress, responsibility or skill? For example, Doctors (quite rightly) demand to be paid well for the overtime they do, and they (rightly) get it, yet Staff Nurses are expected to do unpaid overtime regularly and are rewarded with threats of job cuts and increment freezes. Consultants (and Doctors as a whole) get well paid for the job they do, and rightly so. Staff Nurses do not.

    Why is this so? It is, as everyone knows, because the GMC has teeth and Doctors stick together. The powers that be know they would lose any fight they tried to pick with them. As a result they have power and influence. They can set their own working conditions and pay.

    Contrast this with Nurses. The RCN are a joke, barely nothing more than a government sycophant. Nurses as a profession are generally spineless and subservient. The powers that be know they can do whatever the hell they like to our profession and get away with it.

    This needs to stop. We need to take a leaf out of our colleagues book and stand together. Fight. Then one day, as I said earlier, we may have a strong union and a cohesive, strong profession. Hey, I can dream, right? Only then as a profession will we have similar pay, conditions, power and influence as our medical colleagues.

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  • So thats were our frozen pay and frozen increments will go to...........

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