Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Nurse managers 'use suspension inappropriately'

  • 10 Comments

Nurses and midwives are the clinical groups most likely to be suspended in the NHS but there is no data on reasons for suspensions or associated managerial processes, warn researchers.

However, their review of studies and fitness to practise cases did find evidence that “inexperienced, poorly trained, or poorly supported managers use suspension inappropriately”.

They said: “Managers should refrain from adopting punitive forms of performance management. Frontline staff and management need better training and support for dealing with poor performance.”

  • 10 Comments

Readers' comments (10)

  • "inexperienced, poorly trained, or poorly supported managers use suspension inappropriately”."

    They should probably be suspended for that...............

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Haha well said mags! This headline it seems is a shock to anyone apart from us Nurses! But that's what happened well you let petty tin pot Hitlers take charge!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Thank you nursing Times for reporting on this work published earlier this year as a result of a commission by the National Clinical Assessment Service (NCAS), who oversee the suspension of doctors, dentists and pharmacists, to undertake a literature review on Managing Performance Concerns in Nursing and Midwifery.
    Prof Traynor, who led the research said that one of the questions that NCAS are interested in is the cost of poor performance and performance management in nursing and midwifery.
    Those who have experienced suspension for whistleblowing or for a single drug error, or due to false and unsubstantiated allegations, know only too well of the cost – personal, emotional, mental, financial. It is all encompassing.
    The abstract mentions that Trusts do not report data on suspensions therefore no data exist on numbers, reasons for suspensions, managerial processes, gender, area of work, or ethnicity of those suspended.
    CAUSE (Campaign Against Unnecessary Suspensions and Exclusions UK) has been saying for 8 years now that this is a serious failing by the Department of Health. We believe it would highlight these poorly performing managers, in the hope (though not a strong one, given the NMC’s performance thus far) that some action could be taken to protect their staff.
    In the meantime, the devastation continues, wrecking lives and careers.
    Julie Fagan, founder member of CAUSE

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Julia,

    'Those who have experienced suspension for whistleblowing or for a single drug error, or due to false and unsubstantiated allegations, know only too well of the cost – personal, emotional, mental, financial. It is all encompassing.'

    These are most of the suspensions I have ever come across in over 38 years of nurses. Another reason for suspension and/or disciplinary action that sticks in my mind follows a bullying witchhunt by ward managers and their 'click'.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Sorry second para, second line above, should read 'nursing' not 'nurses'.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I totally applaud the above !

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • since the health services and regulators are so keen on producing guidelines for every thing there should also be clear guidelines on suspension as well.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Albert's Mum

    Anonymous | 11-Mar-2012 8:24 am

    It is often the 'clear guidelines' which are the problem - less tick-box guidance, and the application of a bit more 'sense', is what is needed (but I will admit, tricky to achieve !).

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Shoki | 12-Mar-2012 10:34 am

    Anonymous | 11-Mar-2012 8:24 am

    I totally agree with you but common sense and management don't seem to go hand in hand and certainly don't seem to work in the case of suspension so maybe 'clear guidelines' would help protect nurses from this practice!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • We don't like that nurse, she knows more than us and the patients like her better. Tell you what,let's make up a story about her which we can all exaggerate, hopefully they will get rid of her and we can go back to sitting in the office slagging everyone off.

    Sounds familiar?

    No sexism intended.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.

Related Jobs