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Nurses 'don't question routine practices enough'

  • 3 Comments

Routine practices should be systematically reviewed and updated regularly, as nurses do not generally question them, according to a survey of 400 Irish nurses by researchers from the Institute of Technology in Tralee.

They also found nurses usually relied on colleagues for information when making care decisions, and preferred “pre-packed” guidelines to original research.

They said: “Nurses accessed other people, especially nursing colleagues, the most frequently.”

  • 3 Comments

Readers' comments (3)

  • very difficult when you are in a new job and the HCAs, many who have been there ten years or more, are the driving force and refuse to change their ways because it 'has always been done that way' or the shifts you are in charge of and constanly reminded in the absence of the director of nursing care "she says...". How many times a day did i hear this and even on a couple of occasions when I refused to carry out instructions she had left for me which I considered unsafe practice and which did not follow up to date guidelines, with the resolve to discuss this with her on her return the next day. However, she was in a position of authority which she did allow to be questioned and especially by a new nurse even thouugh I happened to have more experience in acute medicine and a higher research degree and was always valued by my previous colleagues and bossess as someone who is very diplomatic -which also applies to suggesting changes to safer practice no matter whether it is to my superiors, peers or juniors! It resulted in the director of the organisation, an administrator and not a qualified clinical professional, showing me the door after four months with the reason that I was not accepted by the team.

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  • michael stone

    I have no evidence to support my 'mainly a hunch' but the findings of those authors do tend to 'not aggressively raise issues' in the same way that doctors might.

    I have a grievance with certain bits of guidance, and I e-mail the authors with detailed critiques - I am not convinced that nurses do that very often, because if they did, it should have prevented some of the nonsense I critique from being written in the first place !

    Although this is a general observation, anyway: you can usually get a more reasoned debate with a consultant, than with someone on a reception desk (and I can argue with people, in the knowledge that those people cannot sack me !).

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  • michael stone

    I have no evidence to support my 'mainly a hunch' but the findings of those authors do tend to back my suspicion that nurses do 'not aggressively raise issues' in the same way that doctors might.

    My typing and proof-reading is AWFUL !

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