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Patients to get charter of rights, says CQC

  • 26 Comments

Hospitals, care homes and GPs could be judged against a new set of patient rights following a radical overhaul of standards announced by the healthcare provider regulator.

Doctors and nurses would be issued with new guidelines under proposals launched this week, which set out an “unambiguous baseline” for care.

The new charter of rights could see hospitals taken over by external experts, bosses dismissed and units closed if standards were continuously breached.

The plans - which must first go out to consultation - are set to be rolled out in hospitals before they are extended to adult social care and other sectors later in the year, the Care Quality Commission said.

The principles that will guide CQC’s work are set out in five questions that will be asked when inspecting services; are they safe, are they effective, are they caring, are they well-led and are they responsive to people’s needs?

Proposals in the consultation include expert inspection teams led by the new chief inspector Sir Mike Richards, a single rating for each hospital, a programme for failing hospitals, a clearer and more effective test to hold named directors to account for their legal commitments to deliver safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care.

CQC chair David Prior said: “These changes mark a break from the past for the CQC. We have not been looking at the right things when we have inspected hospitals and we have not had the right level of clinical expertise to get under the skin of organisations.

“These proposals firmly put patients at the heart of what we do. It should mean that when someone goes into hospital they have confidence that the hospital is getting the basic aspects of care right – the kind of care we all have a right to expect. These standards were not met at Stafford hospital,” he said.

“Our inspectors will focus on things that are meaningful to people, not on bureaucratic processes. They will not tick boxes but miss the point,” Mr Prior added.

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  • 26 Comments

Readers' comments (26)

  • michael stone

    'They will not tick boxes but miss the point'

    Nice objective - I await the practice, to form my judgement !

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  • an extra year of grad. level training will be needed to grasp all of these guidelines, charters, Cs, etc. with regular follow up update courses at post grad. level to keep abreast of the constant changes.

    how can anybody work under such constraints unless they have unlimited memory storage?

    I rang up the DWP about some issue as i was unable to understand the 100 page booklet written in plain English, despite my post grad. degree, or find the relevant information and they put me through to the head of the department specialised in the subject of my enquiry. In all earnestness, she informed me she did not understand it either and there was nobody to ask as all of her staff had been sent off on a course to update them on the latest guidelines. when I offered to phone back at a later date she explained that by then the information they had received on the course would already be out of date necessitating a further 'professional' developmental course and she further volunteered that these courses, presumably at the taxpayers expense, are not cheap! then she went on to blame Mr. Blair for it (so much for employee loyalty and faith in her organisation from a public servant!).

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  • just what i said elsewhere before this article appeared



    "Patients are being told to kick up a fuss if doctors and nurses fail to comply with eight new “commandments of care” being issued as part of a radical overhaul of standards."


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/10124224/Patients-told-to-kick-up-a-fuss-if-doctors-fail-to-meet-new-minimum-standards.html



    Does anybody know what these eight new commandments of care are? they didn't bother to cite them in the DT article!

    will they be in addition to the six Cs?

    will we be given another 'credit card' with them on to remind us?

    what happens if we forget one during the course of our duties?

    will we have a watchdog looking over our shoulder at all times to ensure that we comply and a form to fill in at the end of each shift for the files to prove it?

    additional training at degree level will obviously be required with a period of pre-registration practice to ensure they are thoroughly understood and firmly drilled and instilled into us so they don't just go out the window in any emergency, when we are stressed or exhausted and when we are dealing with difficult patients and those we don't like! :-(

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  • I thought there was already a 'Patients' Charter'. maybe they mean a new of modified one. what has happened to the previous one. we just seem to be going back over and over the same old ground!

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  • From the Consultation:

    "We want to start a genuine public discussion of what these fundamentals of care should be.

    The examples below are purely to timulate this debate:
    > I will be cared for in a clean environment.
    > I will be protected from abuse and
    discrimination.
    > I will be protected from harm during my care and treatment.
    > I will be given pain relief or other prescribed medication when I need it.
    > When I am discharged my ongoing care will have been organised properly first.
    > I will be helped to use the toilet and to wash when I need it.
    > I will be given enough food and drink and
    helped to eat and drink if I need it.
    > If I complain about my care, I will be listened to and not victimised as a result.
    > I will not be held against my will, coerced or denied care and treatment without my consent or the proper legal authority."


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  • michael stone

    Today's Times has got the list of the 8 propsoed commandments as:

    I will be cared for in a clean enviroment

    I will be protected from abuse and discrimination

    I will be protected from harm during my care and treatment

    I will be given pain relief or other prescribed medication when I need it

    When I am discharges my ongoing care will have been organised properly first

    I will be helped to use the tiolet and to wash when I need it

    I will be given enough food and drink and heleped to eat and drink if I need it

    I will be the one to decide whether or not to give consent - or if I lack capacity to do so then legal safeguards will be upheld

    Which are similar to the list in the earlier post, except for the final two.

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  • can we have a staff charter too please.

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  • I'm all for the patient's charter, although we do already have one. After all, we are all existing or potential patients ourselves.
    However, it will be meaningless unless the staffing levels, skill/mix and resources exist to provide the staff with the ability to fulfill these 8 commandments. This will not happen.

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  • Anonymous | 17-Jun-2013 4:17 pm

    you must have a staff charter or statute!

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  • tinkerbell

    one of the private homes i visit on my rounds is currently under CQC scrutiny with threat of closure and rightly so. The nurse manager is overwhelmed by all the recommendations, so in an effort to offer her support I said we need to break this down to it's simplest must haves.

    First and foremost we must focus on physiological needs and work our way upwards in Abraham Maslows Hierarchy of Needs. I gave her some references and made a drawing of the triangle as best i could, as drawing is not a talent i posess. She breathed a sigh of relief and said 'thank you'.

    I didn't want her to feel overwhelmed by what seemed really complicated when in fact the above charter spells it out much more clearly. Well done CQC, hopefully you are finally getting to grips with what is fundamentally vital before worrying about the lock on a sluice room door which you once quizzed me on for half an hour. That is half an hour i will never get back.

    As Maslow said 'if you only have a hammer in your tool box you will treat everything as though it were a nail'.

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