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RCN pension vote timetable revealed

  • 12 Comments

Royal College of Nursing members are to be asked if they wish to accept the government’s “final” pensions proposals from the end of this month.

The ballot papers will be sent out to all RCN members, apart from those who have already retired, in the week beginning 30 January. Members will have until 27 February to make their vote count.

The following day the RCN Council will meet to discuss the group’s next step on behalf of its members.

Peter Carter, RCN chief executive and general secretary, said: “We would encourage all members to study their voting papers, make their choice and influence what happens next. This will enable the council to gauge the true feeling and mood of the membership so it is vital that as many members as possible take part in this critical process.”

RCN members will be able to vote online, by telephone or by returning their voting papers in a pre-paid envelope.

 

  • 12 Comments

Readers' comments (12)

  • Carter must be scared he will have to do something.... or will the question be so biased that members vote for acceptance?

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  • If health and social care bill is allowed through the pension issue will be irrelevant.

    Private providers will not have to honour NHS pensions

    The market place is no place for conscience or comapssion, and therefore the nation's health.

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  • it seems that the concept of care for the population's health and welfare is already dead and gone and is being replaced by the competitive market with a central focus on profit and loss from the industry whose organisations will be judged by S&P credit ratings!

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  • Anonymous | 19-Jan-2012 11:42 am

    Well said, everything else is academic right now.

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  • I've been a nurse for most of my life and like many nurses my age I can 'retire' at 55 - next year in fact. My generation of nurses are the in the greatest in number and also the most experienced of the workforce - when we go, it will be noticed.

    RCN report NHSPRB staff side evidence to review body 2008-2010 section 4.15 identifies some 200,000 Registered Nurses (30% of the workforce) are 'eligible to retire in the next 10 years' and these figures are already 2 years out of date.

    The pension debacle and this Social Care Bill shenanigans are very likely to be my final straw - I will jump ship from the NHS next year and take my pension whilst I still can. I will either come back to the NHS to work part time or work for a non NHS provider or do Agency - probably doing the job I just retired from: so the public get to pay for my post twice. Now, I am no accountant, but this seems like a false economy in the long term to me.

    But most worryingly of all, if I am thinking this so will the other 199,000 Registered Nurses in the same position as me.

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  • "I will either come back to the NHS to work part time or work for a non NHS provider or do Agency - probably doing the job I just retired from: so the public get to pay for my post twice."

    I believe the nhs pension is suspended, or possibly just reduced according to the individual's situation and other pensions, if retirees return to work.

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  • tinkerbell

    were most nurses born in 1957 then when aquarius was in alignment with saturn?

    Apparently you can no longer take your pension and return to work in the new cut backs, but any up date would be good if anyone knows better, as this is what my pension dept told me. It all stopped recently. You now have to reapply for your post or something and might not get it as they would prefer to employ someone else on a lower band.

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  • Anon 19th Jan 4.50

    You are correct: having taken one's pension - earnings will be capped in recognition of this - thus many nurses come back 'part time' for this reason. But this 'cap' will not be effective in a NON NHS setting - and many providers of Healthcare are NOT NHS anymore!

    Most NHS employers will have a Pension's Policy which will allow these 'pensioners' to come back (often to their own dept) after a specific time period. My employer run pension courses and requires notice of 4 months if this policy is to be envoked.

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  • Anonymous | 20-Jan-2012 6:31 pm

    from Anon 19th Jan 4.50

    thanks for your clarification. it seems that advice needs to be taken at the time of considering returning to employment as they appear to be according to personal circumstances and the goal posts are continually moving!

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  • tinkerbell

    can you take your pension at 55 and return back to the same job you had in the nhs though? I don't mind coming back part time but will still need to work doing something to pay the bills.

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