Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Row holds up 'nurse friendly' hospital rebuild

  • 4 Comments

A row over rebuilding an NHS hospital so it has only single rooms is holding up badly needed improvements to assist nursing staff, a trust chief executive has said.

A judicial review application to stop the rebuild of the Royal Liverpool University Hospital using private investment has cost the trust £8m in delays already.

The application, brought by the Keep Our NHS Public group, states the £450m private finance initiative project fails to ensure value for money.

A hearing in August last year ruled there was no case for a judicial review and the trust said yesterday it had been informed that legal aid funding had been withdrawn for the review claim. However an appeal against the hearing decision is still due to take place on 11 February.

Tony Bell, chief executive of the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals Foundation Trust, told Nursing Times that the existing hospital was designed in the 1960s and the technology used by nursing staff now requires an “entirely different approach”.

The new wards, which will consist solely of single rooms, “gives nurses more flexibility” and the opportunity to have confidential dialogue with patients.

Mr Bell added: “We are cautiously optimistic that the previous ruling of Mr Justice Burnett will be upheld in the forthcoming hearing, still to take place on February 11. The legal challenge so far has proved both costly and time-consuming and we are hopeful that we shall soon be able to move forward with our bidders on our plans to build the new Royal.”

Keep Our NHS Public member Sam Semoff said the costs of servicing the PFI debt would be around £500m and the costs of the delays would be a small price to pay to stop the project.


 

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • just another step to privatisation. I have been in a private hospital abroad (as a pt). The door is closed all the time, found it rather scarey. I was on holiday at the time, I had an on-suite, TV and a balconey, the only thing missing was cooking facilities!!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • typo error above should have read en-suite.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • About the only good point this 'new' will facilitate is privacy and dignity. Patients at risk of falling what happens to them when funding will not allow extra staff to special these patients on a 1-2-1 basis, because they will not be seen (unless there are glass walls) surely this will increase their risk of injury. Dementia patients that wander are they expected to keep to their rooms or will their be special provision for this. my colleagues have discussed these issues and so far we have concluded that the risks out weigh the benefits. Nursing isn't about looking at your patients via a computer screen it's about being hands on and making sure as professionals we are doing the right thing by our patients, yes everybody would love to work in a nice new hospital, but at the end of the day it's the care received that matters not the building it's delivered in!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • About the only good point this 'new' hospital will facilitate is privacy and dignity. Patients at risk of falling what happens to them when funding will not allow extra staff to special these patients on a 1-2-1 basis, because they will not be seen (unless there are glass walls) surely this will increase their risk of injury. Dementia patients that wander are they expected to keep to their rooms or will their be special provision for this. my colleagues have discussed these issues and so far we have concluded that the risks out weigh the benefits. Nursing isn't about looking at your patients via a computer screen it's about being hands on and making sure as professionals we are doing the right thing by our patients, yes everybody would love to work in a nice new hospital, but at the end of the day it's the care received that matters not the building it's delivered in!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.