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Third of acute trusts do not display named clinicians above patient beds

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Over a third of trusts are not displaying a named clinician above patient beds despite health secretary Jeremy Hunt introducing the policy 18 months ago.

Freedom of information requests were sent to every NHS acute trust by consultancy and technology firm Hotboard, which shared the responses with Nursing Times’ sister title HSJ. Out of 108 respondents 39 (36%) were not displaying the name of the clinician and nurse responsible for each patient’s care above their bed.

The request asked each trust: “How many of your hospitals and clinics display the name of the clinician and nurse responsible for each patient’s care above their bed?”

In June 2013 Mr Hunt called for the names of the responsible consultant and nurse to be written above every patient’s bed.

In a speech he said: “However superb the team, the buck always needs to stop with someone and the patient has every right to know who that person is.

The named clinician policy was adopted following the publication of the Francis report in February 2013, which called for increased transparency in the NHS.

As a result, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges recommended all hospitals should display the name of the clinician and nurse responsible for each patient’s care above their bed.

Michael Ward-Hendry, founder and managing director of Hotboard, said: “That almost a third of NHS trusts are still failing to display the name of the clinician and nurse responsible for each patient’s care is unacceptable.

“Almost two years have passed since the Francis report was published, yet a vast amount of hospitals continue to fail their patients.”

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Readers' comments (1)

  • If one of the core themes of the Francis report was poor governance in health, then not much has been learned if there has been so little action in response to this policy.

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