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Time for the NHS to hit back against fraudulent claims?

  • Comments (15)

She mentioned how she had been subpoenaed to appear in court as a witness in a false claim for work-related injury brought by a nurse on her ward.

Fortunately for the hospital, the nurse had failed to check her facts, and had claimed to have been left alone and forced to move an obese patient. Had she done her research she may not have chosen to cite a patient who had cachexia due to advanced cancer, or to claim the injury occurred on a day she was not on shift.

Of course the nurse received no compensation - but that was the end of the matter. Her union had funded her case, and the hospital took no action against her for making what was obviously a fraudulent claim so while she didn’t make any money, nor did she lose anything.

Many health professionals, but particularly nursing staff, incur serious work-related injuries for which they justly receive financial compensation - although most would probably prefer to give the money back if they could regain their health. But there are always a few bad apples in any barrel - and most of those who make fraudulent claims probably do their homework a little more thoroughly than this nurse. They also have access to unscrupulous ambulance-chasing legal services who will ensure they do not make elementary mistakes.

With budgets stretched to breaking point and jobs being axed to save money, the NHS cannot afford to spend thousands defending fraudulent claims. Perhaps it is time to hit back. In situations as blatant as this nurse’s, surely there is an argument for suing or pressing criminal charges rather than letting them go unpunished? It would not take too many frauds being made an example of to make the stakes high enough to deter others.

  • Comments (15)

Readers' comments (15)

  • If true this "Nurse" should have been dismissed by her employing authority and referred to the NMC as being probably unfit to practise.

    Dishonesty and attempted fraud point to a seriously flawed character. This person will try in future to defraud the NHS again if not stopped.

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  • Anonymous

    Er, what about the patients and their relatives who make far more spurious claims about staff every single day! Going to hit back against them are you? Of course not, just the nurses as usual.

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  • I agree with the last poster anonymous 0.12am. I actually opened this article thinking that it was going to be about patients or relatives making fraudulent claims and that finally the NHS was going to do something about it.

    I really should have known better should'nt I of course it's the wicked unscrupulous nurses who we're out to get isn't it.

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  • Anonymous

    In my opinion we should hit back equally against anyone making a false claim be they patient or nurse - or anyone else. Fraud is fraus whoever commits. I understand that nurses feel vulnerable (and I am one of them) byt why should the unscruplous be able to get away with it?

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  • Anonymous

    I sustained an injury at work due to someone elses carelessness, had photos and witness statements to prove it. Took 4 years to get a miniscule amount of compensation (off work for a year) because of the lies told by those responsible.

    They tried to say that I had done it deliberately, that they were'nt there at the time - it was laughable but stressful too and I could'nt believe the hospital dragged it out for so long, wasting all that money on legal fees when it was clear they were in the wrong.

    At the time of the incident the senior nurse I had to report to said it wasn't worth pursuing a claim, never gets you anywhere, causes bad feeling, they'll just speak to the other persons supervisor - usual hide-your-head-in-the-sand nonsense from the NHS - her disgraceful attitude made me even more determined to see it through.

    No, it wasn't a nurse who was careless but it was someone working in the hospital under contract. She did not lose her job, neither did her supervisor or any others who blatantly lied - it never got to court, it was settled the morning before it was due to be heard.

    Pathetic.

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  • King Vulture

    'Of course the nurse received no compensation - but that was the end of the matter. Her union had funded her case, and the hospital took no action against her for making what was obviously a fraudulent claim so while she didn’t make any money, nor did she lose anything.'

    If this is real-life, it is totally unacceptable, providing those facts are establishes and not disputed.

    Anonymous | 28-Aug-2012 9:47 am

    '... because of the lies told by those responsible.'

    Yep, that almost always happens. And you can't assume that 'the appointed judge' (as in the body deciding the claim, not necessarily a court) will be impartial, either.



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  • Anonymous

    this article has nothing whatsoever to do with 'poor record keeping' as suggested, it is about nurses (again) telling lies.

    If anyone, anywhere, tells a lie when they are found out they should be punished.

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  • Anonymous

    fraud is fraud who ever is guilty and has to be dealt with accordingly.

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  • Anonymous

    Here here!

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  • tinkerbell





    'Of course the nurse received no compensation - but that was the end of the matter. Her union had funded her case, and the hospital took no action against her for making what was obviously a fraudulent claim so while she didn’t make any money, nor did she lose anything' (as above)

    Something funny going on? Why wouldn't they prosecute if they had a water tight case whether it be against a nurse or otherwise. Fraud is fraud.

    Has this nurse still got her job, can she be deemed trustworthy to take care of patients, medications, controlled drugs and all the responsibilities invested in us?

    All sounds decidedly dodgy to me, who's fooling who?

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