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Your signature counts - sign now to ensure nurses have real influence in the new NHS

  • 4 Comments

Nurses are being urged to petition health secretary Andrew Lansley to ensure the vital skills and expertise of the profession are not overlooked under plans for commissioning healthcare.

The Nursing Times campaign, A Seat on the Board, aims to ensure nurses are involved at the highest level of the new GP commissioning consortia.

The consortia will be handed the bulk of decision making on NHS spending in April 2013 and are set to be dominated by GPs.

To kick off the campaign, Nursing Times has set up an online petition calling for Mr Lansley to advise future consortia to include a nursing representative on their board or top leadership tier.

Readers can sign up to the campaign statement: “Nurses must be actively involved in the new commissioning consortia being set up from now until April 2013, and their involvement must be at the highest level.

“Nurses don’t just deserve to be on the board because of their number, but because of their unique experience in the NHS. They have a different focus from GPs, with a strong emphasis on patient care and quality of patient experience, and are the only professionals who deliver holistic patient care.”

NHS Derbyshire County director of nursing and quality Maggie Boyd said the A Seat on the Board campaign offered nurses a “great opportunity to show their worth”.

She said: “If we fail to take this opportunity, the profession’s added value and a chance to retain the learning from primary care trust models will be lost. Good quality patient care remains central to decision making, whether that is at an individual patient care level or across the population.”

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • I'm about to go for my interview at Lincoln University to become a Student Nurse. I've always wanted to be a nurse and it will be a privilege to be accepted. Nurses are frontline health workers. They are usually amongst the first people to deal with emergencies and new admissions. It is vital that they have their say for the present and future generationss of nurses.

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  • nursing specialties in the uk are too fagmentised for a unique voice to be pulled together, we need to learn from our colleagues in scandinavia countries and the usa or canada. Likewise, the value added for been a nurse in the uk is not highly rated by the public because majority of our employer is the nhs which might be viewed as doing nurses a favour for employing them not on the value and quality we bring to the table. Nurses have a better voice in usa and canada because most employers are private. It not about bringing a nurse to the board it about value added to the profession by both public and government.

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  • We most definitely need nurse representation to avoid' sand being kicked in our faces'. Nurses with mettle.

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  • Anonymous | 13-Dec-2010 7:38 pm


    I've always wanted to be a nurse and it will be a privilege to be accepted.

    It is a very great privilege indeed but please remember they are also priviledged in having you if they accept you and if you qualifiy and are successful in your career so are your future employers highly priviledge to have you on their staff. It works both ways.

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