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Danazol

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VOL: 101, ISSUE: 37, PAGE NO: 37

GENERIC AND PROPRIETARY NAMES

 

GENERIC AND PROPRIETARY NAMES
- Danazol.

 

 

- Danol.

 

 

ACTION
- This is a synthetic steroid hormone that inhibits pituitary gonadotrophins.

 

 

- It combines androgenic activity with antioestrogenic and antiprogestogenic activity.

 

 

CLASSIFICATION
- Drugs affecting gonadotrophins.

 

 

- Gonadotrophin inhibitor.

 

 

INDICATIONS
- Endometriosis.

 

 

- Pain and tenderness in benign fibrocystic breast disease not responding to other treatment.

 

 

CONTRAINDICATIONS
- Pregnancy.

 

 

- Breastfeeding.

 

 

- Severe hepatic, renal or cardiac impairment.

 

 

- Thromboembolic disease.

 

 

- Undiagnosed genital bleeding.

 

 

- Androgen-dependent tumours.

 

 

- Porphyria.

 

 

CAUTIONS
- Older people.

 

 

- Polycythaemia.

 

 

- Epilepsy.

 

 

- Diabetes.

 

 

- High blood pressure.

 

 

- Migraine.

 

 

COMMON SIDE-EFFECTS
- Nausea.

 

 

- Dizziness.

 

 

- Skin reactions.

 

 

- Acne or oily skin.

 

 

- Backache.

 

 

- Changes in libido.

 

 

- Weight gain.

 

 

In women

 

 

- Menstrual disturbance.

 

 

- Hirsutism.

 

 

- Decrease in breast size.

 

 

- Hoarseness or deepening of voice.

 

 

INTERACTIONS
- May increase the effects of anticoagulants and possibly increase the risk of severe bleeding.

 

 

- May reduce the effects of antidiabetic medication.

 

 

- May increase the effects of some antiepileptic medication and some immunosuppressants.

 

 

ADMINISTRATION
- Oral.

 

 

NURSING CONSIDERATIONS
- Ensure that patients with amenorrhoea are not pregnant.

 

 

- Non-hormonal contraceptive methods should be used if appropriate.

 

 

- There is a slight risk of liver damage, so regular monitoring through liver function tests is recommended.

 

 

PATIENT TEACHING
- This medication will have some effect after a few days, but the full benefits may take some months.

 

 

- Treatment is normally for between three and nine months and symptoms may recur when medication is stopped. Patients should therefore consult with their prescribing health care professional before ceasing this medication.

 

 

- Ensure women are aware of possible virilisation side-effects. Advise them to make urgent contact if they experience these as they may be irreversible with continued use.

 

 

- Menstrual periods may be irregular or absent while taking this medication.

 

 

Nurses should refer to manufacturer’s summary of product characteristics and to appropriate local guidelines

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