Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Screening programme could prevent MI

  • Comment
A screening and treatment programme for middle-aged adults with a family history of heart disease could prevent more than four in 10 premature myocardial infarctions, research has revealed.

A screening and treatment programme for middle-aged adults with a family history of heart disease could prevent more than four in 10 premature myocardial infarctions, research has revealed.

According to the University of Glasgow research, immediate family members of patients with premature coronary heart disease are at significantly increased risk of developing the disease.

Siblings are twice as likely to have a heart attack and partners are also at greater risk because of shared factors such as lifestyle.

Researchers found that the 14% of families with a positive family history accounted for 48% of all CHD events and 72% of all premature deaths.

They based findings from data collected in previous studies, which showed that in England and Scotland alone, 7,369 premature heart attacks occur every year in people with a family history of premature heart attacks. Of those, 6,485 might be preventable.

They calculated from the data that screening and treating middle-aged adults with a family history could have prevented 42% of premature heart attacks and 8% of all heart attacks.

BMJ (2007) 335: 481-485

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.