Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Should nurses undertake study in their own time?

  • Comments (16)

Nursing is described as a profession, but terms such as “vocation” and “calling” are also used to describe the principles that attract people into nursing.

 

What do you think? Should nurses undertake study in their own time?

  • Comments (16)

Readers' comments (16)

  • Whether they should or should not is largely a philosophical question, but the reality is that many nurses currently do and they also pay for it.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    I think nurses do and should undertake some amount of studying in their own time otherwise we would never get any competencies done or any self personal development if everthing has to be done at work or during working hours. There should be some amount of commitment to the job on both sides especially on the nurse's part.
    it is sometimes not feasible for the employer to give time away from the clinical environment and if someone can do some modules on line at home, why not? She is not doing the employer a favour but it's for her own good as well. thank you.
    Abby

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I think there is a clear distinction that should be applied between education that benefits the individual and the employer and that which is required by the NHS.

    For example attendance at mandatory training is a requirement that can't be excused and forms part of the requirements of any job. Therefore this should be given 100% study time. With the key litmus test being that this is a non transferable skill that can only be used in the current employment.

    With education that spans an individuals employment, potentially in multiple trusts, i feel that a proportion (not all of it) should be done in the nurses own time. Currently my department usees 50%, which is a reasonable approach given that the course not only benefits the employer, but your career for many years to come.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • It is a requirement of being a professional that we keep our knowledge and skills up to date.
    With budgets for training often being the first to be hit when Cost Reduction Programmes (CRP) are implemented then it is inevitable that nurses have to find the time and money to do this for themselves.
    However, there is really no reason for learning to be an expensive or time consuming activity.
    completing learning units on NT Learning or reading an article on some aspect of practice are very effective.
    The benefit to your professional development and to the care given to your patients by just taking 15-20 minutes each day to learn, should not be underestimated.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    Nurses and Midwives alike do and should undertake study to keep current in their practice. There are many levels that should be doing this from those who provide care or directing care to those educating and in academic roles.
    Dr's do continuing education for that very reason as do other professions and even those in non-professional roles.
    It could be an area centrally governed so that you must obtain so many credits a year validating your right to practice.
    It could then be something expected on a CV. These credits could go on to provide further qualications and expertise in other areas of practice.
    Employers could contribute to the cost of these credits by way of employee benefits and rewarding good service etc.
    Continuing self directed reading and studying is always going to be an education and a good thing!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Given that a lot of nurses have to do their daily work in their own time (ie after shifts), then I should imagine these same nurses do the same with study!

    Seriously though, would we ask this in any other profession? How many Office Workers do their studying in their own time? I suspect only those that are doing it for Personal Achievement and those doing it for Professional (ie needed for work) are being given the time off from work to do it. So why is Nursing different? Because, while we are supposedly a profession, people still think of Nursing as a Vocation and a Calling. As long as Nursing is a Profession, then we should be the same as any other Profession...end of story. If we want to start using Vocation etc as an excuse, then we need to stop being a Profession

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    Even as a supposed 'link nurse' on my ward I wasn't given time off to attend the 4 relevant study days, these were in my own time.

    At mandatory training we see nurses who have come in on their days off or after finishing a night shift.

    Of course nurses shouldn't do 'study' in their own time but they do. Reading articles, books, on-line etc. is all just part of our job, I do all of it at home, never enough time at work to go to the library.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    I do my mandatory training as required, read articles as and when I have time but unless extra study is going to benefit me in the long term and not just my current job then I do not see why I should do this unpaid even if I had the time which I don't.
    I am fed up in my current job (non ward based) where I have been for 10 years, I am sick of the stress and empty promises and the additional responsibilities without the financial benefit. I want desperately to do further training to gain additional skills and refresh skills which I have not used for many years which would help me move on (not necessarily up) to a more stimulating environment but every time I ask about training within the trust I am told its not relevant to my clinical area even though it would enable me to be redeployed within the trust. Unfortunately I cannot afford to fund the training myself and cannot work days off due to other commitments and it is practical hands on experience I need not just theory.
    I have asked if I can be released for one day a week to another clinical area within my directorate where I might gain the skills but have been flatly refused. I am now at the stage of leaving the trust and just applying for anything which will get me out of current job but in reality as a mature nurse without recent ward based skills my chances are slim.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • What else can you do on the bog with the Nursing Times? Read it to keep abreast?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    Is it not true that nursing education is to a level so that the graduate nurse is seen as professional?

    paying for and studying in own time should be compared to other professions eg teachers have training days and the schools close. (not practical for sick people)

    Do solicitors and banker train in own time at own cost?
    do the police do this?
    as a predominantly male profession highly unlikely?
    Mandatory training should be during study leave and the NHS would save a fortune if mandatory training was transferabe

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Show 1020results per page

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.