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'Start planning now and you'll find revalidation painless'

  • Comments (10)

It’s been talked about for so long that nurses could be forgiven for thinking nurse revalidation would never happen. But it is happening – and it’s happening soon.

From April 2016 all nurses will be required to undertake a range of revalidation activities including CPD, reflections and collating feedback.

In the current system, few nurses are asked to prove they have done 35 hours’ CPD when renewing their registration every three years. However, with revalidation, managers will have to confirm nurses have completed all their revalidation activities, so employers are now getting actively involved.

At last week’s Nursing Times Deputies’ Congress, half a day was spent helping deputy chief nurses get their organisations ready for revalidation.

Probably the most eagerly awaited session was a report from the organisations that have piloted the proposed new system. I suspect most people in the room were expecting to hear of some painful experiences.

But that’s not what happened.

The pilot sites acknowledged the challenges they had encountered - that’s to be expected in a pilot. But the sites not only survived the experience – they seemed positively energised by it. They spoke of revalidation as more than just a way of protecting patients by ensuring nurses are fit to practise. It is also a way for the profession to demonstrate its worth, and for individual nurses to embrace a culture of continual learning.

And the individual nurses in the pilot sites also seemed to have embraced revalidation.

While they may have had their doubts in the early stages, in practice they realised they were already doing most of the revalidation activities. As one said: “We’re already doing this – we just weren’t writing it down before”.

For the vast majority of nurses, revalidation won’t require many new activities – it will mainly involve keeping track of them and their impact on patient care. If you do that as you go along, you’ll find revalidation painless.

You may even start to value it as you realise the benefits it can bring to you and your practice.

  • Comments (10)

Readers' comments (10)

  • Anonymous

    As one said: “We’re already doing this – we just weren’t writing it down before”.

    Don't we have enough paperwork as it is? When are we going to find the time for all the extra writing and who is going to pay for that time?

    Be realistic. There are not enough nurses to cover shifts at the moment resulting in extortionate salaries being paid to agency nurses. How is this going to work?

    Ms Cummings please explain? Another C for you Cost?

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  • And when you have a manager who bullies staff, who misuses KSF appraisals as a form of disciplinary action and then refuses to allow another suitably qualified person to conduct your appraisal, who refuses to authorise training for nurses, who refuses to countenance time for personal study, who forbids nurses from arranging meetings to discuss issues around practice which would constitute reflection...

    What price re-validation (which is a good thing in theory) then?

    PS All of the above is true.

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  • What a waste of time this will,be. Just add more time and stress to the job.

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  • Anonymous

    you will of course need paid time off work to do all of this!

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  • Anonymous

    As usual, we blindly follow the GMC in their practices, regardless of whether it has worked or not and regardless of whether it adds value. As a nurse manager with responsibility for Dr revalidation, I witnessed first hand the time and effort it took to revalidate one Dr (I have managerial responsibility for 12) and how ultimately, it was a paper exercise, open to abuse. The managerial man hours I devoted, and continue to devote, to this process is enormous. Who would want to be a manager these days?

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  • Anonymous

    I think its time to scrap my registration , too much hassel , hard work and abuse for not enough reward. This profession is all take , everyone wants a piece of you. Ward nurses are struggling with ever increasing workloads ,unsafe working conditions and staff shortages ,now this. After 30 years I have watched the job I once loved deteriorate to what it is today, paperwork ,pen pushers , nit pickers and jobsworths, sorry but I have had enough it used to be about caring for patients- what went wrong?

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  • Anonymous

    I have to confess amusement at the skill with witch the NMC have increased registration fees over the last few years (to cover administration) and have adeptly handed 'revalidation' over to the Trusts managers!

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  • Anonymous

    I agree with all the comments posted. I am relieved to have only a few years left in the so called nursing profession. I have worked at all levels within nursing and find myself disillusioned by the NMC stance on how it supposedly supports it's members. As one person has put it, they blindly follow the GMC - regardless of whether revalidation of doctors has proved itself to be an effective way of determining quality care. I think not. We are deemed to be professionals by the NMC but clearly not enough to ask us what we think about revalidation!

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  • Anonymous

    I dont see how this is going to add value to my practise. I have noted that over the last 22years, being told that I need to update, drop a lot of practises, evidence based paractise only to be brought back as new evidence. Nursing has progressed in theory but not reality. Infact, on the ground, its worse off than what it was. I just think this revalidation business is gonna be a hassle, a lot of ass-licking managers to complete it for you. I can actually count the times I've had an appraisal. I dont know what happened to the rest coz managers was busy, maternity leave, off-sick etc. I got tired of it all. Also, I wonder who will complete validation for full-time agency staff.

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  • Anonymous

    Such valid points above! I completely agree with the above and have to wander what state is the NHS is going to be in when nurses decide this profession is simply to much like hard work, as we are already over worked with staff shortages and under paid and now the NMC are asking tired, worn out nurses to spend their days off revalidating and stressing over getting feedback from already over work managers surely those sitting in offices should step out once in a while and see what its really like out there for us workers. I feel this will put the NHS into a bigger mess than what its already in as nurses will give up their profession and ultimately the patients who you are trying to protect will actually be the ones that suffer but not at the hands of the nurses but at the hands of the NMC need to put more stress on already stressed nurses!!

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