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An overview of chronic heart failure management

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THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT:

  • The definition and symptoms of chronic heart failure (CHF)
  • How the heart functions normally and how the body responds to CHF
  • Statistics on prevalence and cost
  • How CHF is diagnosed as well as pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

  • Chronic heart failure
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Dyspnoea

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL TO ME?

This article provides a comprehensive overview of CHF, including its definition, symptoms, signs and diagnosis methods, treatment options, prevalence and cost. It will be useful in helping you understand one of the most common conditions. The discussions on how the heart functions normally, how CHF alters the bodies functioning, and non-pharmacological strategies for treatment will be especially useful in the education of patients.

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR:

  • What are some practical strategies for helping a patient with CHF make needed lifestyle changes?
  • How can I best present to a patient what CHF is and how it affects the body?

 

STUDENT NT DECODER:

Dyspnoea: shortness of breath, generally; includes orthopnoea, which is dyspnoea that occurs when lying down, and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea, which refers to dyspnoea attacks at night. In all forms, dyspnoea is a symptom of CHF.

Epidemiology: the study of the occurrence of a condition within a certain group of people

Myocardial Infarction: known commonly as a heart attack

Oedema: collection of fluid beneath the skin that creates swelling

 

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