Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Are you confident in managing central venous access devices?

  • Comment

Article:

Preventing and managing complications of CVADs

Authors:

Janice Gabriel is strategic clinical networks manager at NHS England (Wessex), Southampton.

 

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • Commonly used long-term central venous access devices
  • Potential problems that can hinder treatment
  • How these problems can be managed or their likelihood

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

Long-term conditions in general, or specifically central venous access devices (CVADs). This article gives a good overview of how health professionals can safely manage CVADs and advises on how to involve patients in the decision-making process. It may also be helpful to reference in essays about infection prevention and control as it goes in to detail on how to reduce associated infection risks.

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

At some point during your training or career, you are likely to be caring for a patient who has a CVAD fitted. This article will help to prepare you for this and give you an understanding of why certain steps are taken.

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • How can the risk of infection be minimised when someone has a CVAD?
  • What steps should be taken when changing the dressing on a CVAD?

 

STUDENT NT DECODER

Skin-tunnelled catheters

Also known as central lines. A CVAD that is inserted directly in to the venous system through the chest to enable medication and fluids to be administered.

Peripherally inserted central catheters

A type of CVAD that is inserted in to a peripheral vein in the arm, with the tip lying in the superior vena cava or cavoatrial junction.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.