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Do you know enough about managing pain in compression bandaging?

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THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT:

  • Leg ulcer aetiology and comorbidity in diagnosis and treatment
  • Process and strategies for effective leg ulcer assessment and treatment
  • Effects of leg ulcers on patients’ well-being

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

  • Leg ulcers
  • Wound assessment
  • Comorbidity

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL TO ME?

This article emphasises the importance of considering all the factors that contribute to a patient’s health when assessing and treating leg ulcers. Guidance on wound assessment—based on the TIME model and other tools—is especially useful. The author also describes the appearance of venous and arterial ulcers but urges that they be used in context of the larger picture of wound assessment.

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • What strategies would you suggest for more accurate diagnosis of leg ulcer aetiology and comorbidities if the patient cannot communicate well?
  • Can you tell me more about managing pain in compression bandaging?

STUDENT NURSING TIMES DECODER

  • Aetiology: causation
  • Comorbity: when a condition exists independently of and at the same time as another condition. While the two will combine to affect the overall well-being of the patient, neither is considered to be caused by the other. For example, asthma is a comorbidity in elderly patients with leg ulcers.
  • Ischaemia/ischemia: occurs when a tissue receives inadequate blood, resulting in too little oxygen and glucose for proper functioning
  • Oedema: collection of fluid beneath the skin that creates swelling
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