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Do you know the signs of sepsis?

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Article

Early identification and treatment of sepsis

Authors

Heather McClelland is nurse consultant in emergency care, Alex Moxon is emergency department staff nurse; both at Calderdale and Huddersfield Foundation Trust

 

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • The anatomy of sepsis
  • Signs and symptoms that can help you to identify sepsis
  • How to manage sepsis once it has been identified

 

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

As the title suggests, this article would be useful if you were writing about sepsis. It gives a good overview of the frequency at which sepsis occurs, its impact on patients’ health, the anatomy of sepsis and how professionals can spot the signs and treat it effectively. It also gives some background of the history of sepsis, which add some interesting points to an essay.

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

All nurses should be familiar with the clinical signs that indicate sepsis, as it is one of the leading causes of death among hospital patients worldwide. Identifying sepsis early greatly increases a patient’s chances of survival and this article helps you to learn what to look out for.

 

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

Are there any signs or symptoms that to you are a “red flag” suggesting a patient might be septic?

 

 

STUDENT NT DECODER

Vasodilatation

The widening of blood vessels to increase blood flow.

Inflammation

This is the body reacting to stimuli caused by infection and attempting to initiate healing. Signs of inflammation are normally pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.

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