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Find out about nursing research: ethics, consent and good practice

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Article:

Bowrey S, Thompson JP (2014) Nursing research: ethics, consent and good practice. Nursing Times; 110: 1/3, 20-23.

Authors:

Sarah Bowrey is a senior research nurse; Jonathan Paul Thompson is a senior lecturer and honorary consultant; both at department of cardiovascular sciences, University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester Trust.

 

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • The process of conducting medical research in the UK
  • How to recruit research participants
  • Issues of consent, ethics and good clinical practice

 

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

This article would be useful to reference in a literature review. It explains what makes research valid and could justify your decisions to use certain papers and exclude others when reviewing the literature.

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

As the article states, research is carried out in the majority of clinical areas. It can be helpful to understand the process, particularly if patients you are caring for are involved in research, to give you opportunity to advocate on their behalf and ensure proper consent has been given. This may also be an area you want to go in to once you qualify.

 

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • Have you been involved in clinical research?
  • Why is recruiting patients to clinical trials challenging?

STUDENT NT DECODER

Neurodegenerative diseases
Diseases that involve a progressive loss of structure or function of neurons, for example dementia or Parkinson’s disease

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