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How can I identify and manage peripheral arterial disease?

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THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • What peripheral arterial disease is
  • Risk factors for this condition
  • What are the signs of this disease
  • How you can play a part in helping patients to be identified and treated.

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

  • Heart disease
  • Peripheral arterial disease
  • Screening
  • Risk factors for heart disease

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

This article, first in a two-part series, will be useful to you when you come into contact with patients in a diverse range of settings.

Peripheral arterial disease is a common condition, particularly in the over 60s, but two-thirds of cases do not have symptoms and/or are
undiagnosed. This article will alert you to the risk factors and signs of this condition so that you will be able play a part in increasing the number of patients identified with the condition.

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • What should I do if I think one of the patients is at risk of peripheral arterial disease?
  • How do I manage patient anxiety if I discuss their risk with them?
  • What action should I suggest they take to identify their risk?

 STUDENT NT DECODER

  • Peripheral arterial disease: This is when the arteries which deliver blood to the body tissues become less efficient. This is usually because of atherosclerosis.
  • Atherosclerosis: This is when small fatty deposits build up inside your arteries. You are more likely to have atherosclerosis if you are overweight, eat an unhealthy diet, smoke and do not exercise. The deposits narrow and harden arteries making them less efficient.
  • Intermittent claudication: This is a cramp-like pain felt in the calf, thigh or buttock during walking or some other exercise. It is relieved by rest. It is the result a lack of oxygen to the muscles and is most likely the result of atherosclerosis. It is one of the
    signs of peripheral arterial disease.

 

 

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