Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

STUDENT EDITOR BLOG

'I'm suffering from imposter syndrome - and there's nowhere to hide'

  • Comment

This is my final blog. I’m allowed to feel emotional, right? I hope the new editors enjoy their time as much as I did – and if you’re in your first year, apply next year.

I’m two weeks into my final placement and it’s been a bit mixed. I’m suffering from what’s known as imposter syndrome. I’m sure I’ve winged it this far. I panicked a bit in my first week. And the worst thing is our trust is trialling a new badge for management students. It’s bright red and says ’Management Student Nurse’. There is nowhere to hide.

I genuinely think it’s a good idea but it did make my imposter syndrome worse in the first week. The aim of the badge is to make sure that all ward staff are aware of the stage of our training and it’s meant to ensure we get the learning opportunities we need.

“I feel forced into taking the staff nurse role and part of me feels guilty for doing drug rounds instead of breakfasts and making beds”

Does it work?

I hear it’s worked well for the previous cohort that trialled it. For me, it’s been a struggle. I’m sure it will work in time but I feel forced into taking the staff nurse role and part of me feels guilty for doing drug rounds instead of breakfasts and making beds. The bizarre thing is that I’ve spent my training trying to get these opportunities, and now I’m feeling guilty for having them.

The badge has had the most publicity amongst student nurses and hospital staff. However, our lovely Practice Placement Manager has introduced a new Medicines Management workbook.

“At first I groaned. More work? However, when she talked me through it I wished we’d had a form of it in earlier placements”

At first I groaned. More work? However, when she talked me through it I wished we’d had a form of it in earlier placements. Our normal placement workbooks focus on the specifics of drugs and their pharmacology. I have not been taught or tested on trust policies of medications management. We have to print off some policies and answer really useful questions. They are very trust specific, so are great for people who will be working there post-qualification. However, it is also helping me as I’m sure other organisations have similar policies.

The best thing about the workbook? We have to document how many drug rounds we do, and with how many patients. The Practice Placement Manager is using it to see how much exposure we have to proper drug rounds. There’s no point doing evening drug rounds of two patients and then when qualified being expected to do 8-12 in the morning.

”I’m hoping it’s all going to come together by the time my placement finishes in November”

I’m hoping it’s all going to come together by the time my placement finishes in November. I’ve finished my Transition to Qualified Practitioner module work – I have to deliver a presentation next week for that. I’ve also finished my literature review. My placement is the only thing left now.

Then what happens if I pass? We’re hopefully moving back up north to be nearer my family in December. I’ll start my staff nurse job in a hospice in January and we’re getting married in May. Exciting times to come.

I hope you enjoy the rest of your training and get the job you want. Now I can see the light at the end of the tunnel I can say it is 100% worth all the tears. I’m hoping to continue to write and tweet about my time as a newly qualified working in a hospice. I do hope to do more studying in the future – but I’ll have a little break first!

Vicki Abrahams is Student Nursing Times’ adult branch student editor

Reading this on your phone or tablet?

Nursing Times subscribers can now access the latest news affecting the nursing profession on the go with the Nursing Times app.

Search for Nursing Times on your Apple or Android device and log in using the same details you use on the website.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.

Related Jobs