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Maintaining continence in people with dementia

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Andrews J (2013) Maintaining continence in people with dementia. Nursing Times; 109: 27, 20-21.

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • Why people with dementia have continence problems
  • How to assess patients for continence problems
  • Environmental changes you can make that promote continence and dignity

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

This article could be referenced if you were writing about the prevalence of continence problems in those with dementia or the reasons why people with dementia often experience continence problems.

It explains in detail steps you can take to improve this area of care for patients with dementia.

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

This article is particularly good for giving guidance on how to improve continence care, specifically for those with dementia, but the guidance could be applied to other client groups. If you are on placement in a care home, for example, you may find the advice allows you to make the environment more patient-friendly.

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • What steps can be taken to help patients with dementia remain continent?
  • What alternative solutions can be used, rather than incontinence pads?

STUDENT NT DECODER

Incontinence

Involuntary urination or defecation.

Dementia
The term “dementia” is used to describe the symptoms that occur when the brain is affected by specific diseases and conditions. Symptoms of dementia include loss of memory, confusion and problems with speech and understanding. (Source: Alzheimer’s Society - www.alzheimers.org.uk)

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