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Nurses’ role in postoperative care

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Article

Liddle C (2013) Postoperative care 1: principles of monitoring postoperative patients. Nursing Times; 109: 22, 24-26.

Authors

Cathy Liddle is senior lecturer, school of professional practice, department of skills and simulation, Birmingham City University.

 

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • The principles of postoperative care
  • Reasons for vital signs monitoring
  • Considerations for transferring postoperative patients

 

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

The guidelines, policies and evidence base behind postoperative care.

This article particularly focuses on a report by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death, and the recommendations for improving postoperative care that came from this report.

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

This article gives useful guidance for those on placement in perioperative care. It explains nurses’ roles in recovery and in the care of patients for the first few days following surgery. It also gives good rationale for the policies and guidelines behind postoperative care and gives students a clear understanding of how they can assist qualified staff.

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • Which early warning systems do you use?

 

STUDENT NT DECODER

Vital signs

Measures to assess basic body functions. Such as respirations, blood pressure, temperature or pulse.

Analgesia

Drugs that relieve pain, more commonly known as painkillers.

Anaesthesia

Anaesthesia means ‘loss of sensation’. Medications that cause anaesthesia are called anaesthetics. Anaesthetics work by blocking the signals that pass along your nerves to your brain (NHS Choices).

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