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STUDENT BLOG

'The "perfect nurse" - does it exist?'

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It took me three years of rejection and a fluctuating belief in myself to finally gain a place as a child student nurse

I had worked with children and families before in a variety of settings and whenever a nurse was involved I would fangirl - watch wide-eyed and tell them (whether they wanted to hear it or not) that one day I wanted to be a nurse. To me every one was an inspiration, a sensitive and selfless saint who was dedicating their lives to those in need.

“To me every one was an inspiration, a sensitive and selfless saint who was dedicating their lives to those in need”

I was naïve to think that I would be liked by every nurse and that I would like them back simply because of our shared career choice. For a small minority of nurses when they wake up and go to work it is not a calling, only a job to get done and dusted without a hitch.

I was genuinely surprised by the unwillingness of some nurses - not only did they not want to be mentors but some even refused to let me observe their role for an hour or two. One district nurse agreed to have me for a clinic but then didn’t acknowledge my presence once - except to answer my question on choice of wound dressing with ”it’s just what we use”. Friends of mine have had much worse including a talk to the hand gesture in the face and being told to flatly to “go away”.

“I was genuinely surprised by the unwillingness of some nurses - not only did they not want to be mentors but some even refused to let me observe their role for an hour or two”

The flip side to all this is that the majority of nurses are good and do their job well, but some are outstanding nurses, outstanding individuals, outstanding mentors. They become a guru of your nursehood, going beyond clinical skills to offer empowerment, resilience and spiritual support through the ups and downs. They give you a huge hug and tell you to keep going, that you will be an excellent nurse one day and society cannot lose the opportunity to have you caring for them. Nurses like this make the bad ones seem much less powerful somehow.

”They become a guru of your nursehood, going beyond clinical skills to offer empowerment, resilience and spiritual support through the ups and downs”

So, to all of you who are beginning their nursing journey in September remember that throughout life you will meet those you like and those you don’t - and the nursing profession is no different. Remain professional and assertive, seek support from loved ones and advice from link lecturers. You are not alone in your journey and we have all been where you are or soon will be.

Learn from everyone you meet, take the best qualities to form yourself as a nurse and discard those that aren’t ideal with the promise that you will never demonstrate them.

Desiree Redston-Moore is a current child student nurse

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Readers' comments (1)

  • there is never the perfect nurse. Everyone has different unique qualities and foibles. It is never far from my mind the most important person central to care at any level is the patient who may be very vulnerable and acting with there interest in mind as long as outcomes are positive and in the best interest of the patient bit of rucking in any profession is tolerable.Or rather has to be tolerated

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