Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

What is Buteyko breathing technique?

  • Comment

Austin G (2013) Buteyko technique use to control asthma symptoms. Nursing Times; 109: 16: 16-17

Gillian Austin is clinical specialist physiotherapist, pulmonary rehabilitation/respiratory physiotherapy, Hertfordshire Community Trust.

 

THIS ARTICLE WILL TELL YOU ABOUT

  • What the Buteyko breathing technique is
  • The evidence base for this complementary approach
  • Key elements of the method

YOU WOULD BE LIKELY TO REFERENCE THIS ARTICLE IF YOU WERE RESEARCHING:

The Buteyko technique specifically and its evidence base. Alternatively, this article may be useful if you were looking more generally at treatment for respiratory disorders, or researching complementary therapies.

 

IN WHAT SITUATIONS WILL THIS ARTICLE BE USEFUL FOR ME?

This article could be useful if you are based on a respiratory clinic or ward – in this situation it may help you to teach your patients a technique they may not be aware of, complementary to the treatment they are receiving. Alternatively, your placement may already be using the technique and it would be helpful if you are already aware of how it works and why it is used.

 

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR MENTOR/TUTOR

  • Have you ever used the Buteyko breathing technique with patients?
  • What complementary treatments do you feel benefit patients the most?

 

STUDENT NT DECODER

Buteyko breathing technique

A system of breathing exercises and holistic advice that lower patients’ minute volume by reducing both respiratory rate and depth. In simple terms, this means learning to “breathe less”.

Hyperventilation

Breathing faster or deeper than normal. As more carbon dioxide is being breathed out than the body is producing, this can cause a decrease in the amount of carbon dioxide circulating (hypocapnia) so it is important that breathing is returned to normal as soon as possible.

Pulmonary rehabilitation

A programme of interventions, usually offered by a multidisciplinary team, to help control chronic respiratory conditions.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.