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'Will dyslexia hold me back as a nurse?'

  • 1 Comment

Can you advise this soon-to-be student nurse?

“I’m about to start nursing this September and am really worried that my dyslexia is going to hold me back.

“At school I’ve had a lot of support and learnt loads of tricks for how to manage academic work but I’m not sure if this is going to be enough.

“Do you, or any of the nurses you work with, have dyslexia? How does it affect your work as a student nurse?”

 

Please use the comments section below to share your advice

If you would like to post a question here, please contact richard.phippen@emap.com. We will publish first names only, but please let us know if you’d rather remain anonymous.

  • 1 Comment

Readers' comments (1)

  • Hello,

    I am a student nurse, whom today has finished my second year of my adult nursing degree. Moreover, I also have dyslexia and show signs of dyspraxia.

    I have not found any issues with my learning difficulties when on placement, as mentors have always been open to hear any additional help that I may require. Within initial interviews, at the start of each placement, my mentor/coach has discussed with me any concerns I may have; with that, they have always been supportive towards me and I have never found any negativity or prejudice from them. In fact, a majority of mentors I have had in the past tend to admit having learning difficulties themselves, which made their support that much better.

    On the other hand, universities have a duty of care to aid students with learning difficulties. There are a lot of support services available that is provided when you reach out and grab it. However, you must remember that you will now be an independent learner that will not receive help unless you have asked for it, in addition to continuing with your own coping strategies.

    That being said, you are about to enter probably one of the most physically and mentally draining courses out there and you must be committed to get to your end goal; a registered nurse. Do not ever let the stress get ahead of you and always admit when you feel that you are struggling, as lecturers and support teams will always help.

    Welcome to the world of nursing.
    Never give up.

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