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THE BIG QUESTION

The big question: have nursing leaders responded adequately to the Francis report?

  • 4 Comments

In an exclusive interview with Nursing Times, chair of the Mid Staffordshire inquiry Robert Francis QC has said the nursing profession and its leaders have failed to adequately respond to the problems highlighted in his report.

Mr Francis criticised what he perceived as a lack of collective response from the profession as a whole and its representatives.

He compared the response to his recommendations from NHS managers and doctors’ leaders, saying: “They are taking this very seriously. The [medical] royal colleges are taking action.

“Putting it bluntly I have seen rather less of that from the nursing profession,” he said.

Mr Francis claimed he had seen “no reaction” to his call to strengthen the voice of nursing in order to speak up for frontline staff and prevent catastrophic care failings.

What do you think of nursing’s response to the Francis report?

Add your comments and they could be published in the magazine.

  • 4 Comments

Readers' comments (4)

  • Well, the lack of any response from our leadership is noticeable. I've questioned a few senior nurses about the Francis report. They didn't seem to know much about the report, showing little interest in its conclusions. That was in my hospital, so nothing has changed. I think junior nurses are more aware, but are leaderless. I think he is correct though. There doesn't seem to be much movement from above. Does this worry anyone?

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  • Anonymous | 17-May-2013 12:57 pm

    possibly not all nurses feel implicated in the events at Mid Staffs which is only one hospital among thousands. there seem to be plenty of others still providing a very high standard of care.

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  • I think NHS has had a long bullying and blame culture where whistleblowers would end up victimised due to institustional racism. There are certain hospitals who still victimise staff for reporting what they feel is unjust for patients and staff. As highlighted that there is poor leadership in the NHS by the Francis Report is really true due to the fact that newly qualified white nurses are promoted to clinical leadership roles without proven track record of knowledge and skills. Until NHS adopts a fair system on promotion of nurses to these posts then patients will continue being subjected to callous and inhuman decisions by staff.

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  • Anonymous | 17-May-2013 9:08 pm

    "Until NHS adopts a fair system on promotion of nurses to these posts then patients will continue being subjected to callous and inhuman decisions by staff."

    What about personal accountability?
    We can't keep blaming everything on leaders or the system. Particularly if we, as a profession, have not made sufficient efforts to change what is wrong. And clearly we haven't.

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