Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

What makes the best bedside manner?

  • Comments (4)

What makes the best bedside manner? What do you think?

You can continue this conversation on twitter using #bedsidemanner

Patients often perceive that a clinician has spent more time at their bedside when they sit rather than stand, according to nurse researchers from the University of Kansas Hospital.

The issue is explored in: Bedside interaction ‘better when clinicians sit’. Nursing Times. Published online 15 February.

  • Comments (4)

Readers' comments (4)

  • Anonymous

    It has to be a combination of things. I hate seeing staff standing up and talking down to patients. I also think staff should sit down and be at eye level when they are feeding patients.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    Anonymous | 7-Mar-2012 8:10 pm

    I agree. If you are having a conversation of more than a few seconds and more than just small talk it is important and especially if you are explaining or teaching something or listening to or discussing the patients concerns. we were always taught to sit when feeding patients and it gives more of the impression you are giving them your undivided attention and not about to rush off.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • An air of confidence puts patients at ease and inspires trust. But also a friendly and approachable manner is vital.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Anonymous

    As well as what Sarah Stanley says, showing that you are giving the patient your full attention and interest. Using good communication skills such as talking clearly and giving feedback to show that you have listened and to check you understanding of what the patient has said.

    Trying not to rush any interactions and giving the appearance that you are not in a hurry! Easier said than done. If you know you do not have time do not embark on a lengthy talk you know you will have to break off, or make this clear at the outset and make sure you return if you say you will.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment.

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.