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THE BIG QUESTION

Will latest research linking degree nurses to fewer deaths stop negative media stories about education?

  • 2 Comments

New research published in the Lancet has found that significantly fewer deaths occur after routine surgery when there is a higher proportion of nurses who are degree educated.

The researchers found a 10% increase in the proportion of nurses holding a bachelor degree was associated with 7% lower surgical death rates.

The study shows that increasing the nurmber of graduate nurses is necessary if the NHS is to realise the potential of lower patient mortality and fewer adverse patient outcomes.

Will this research stop negative media comments about nurses with degrees?

 

Read the full paper in the Lancet: Nurse staffing and education and hospital mortality in nine European countries: a retrospective observational study

  • 2 Comments

Readers' comments (2)

  • Take a look at this Daily Telegraph report.


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/10661270/Patients-more-likely-to-die-if-treated-by-nurses-without-degrees.html#disqus_thread


    340 mostly negative comments about the profession and the "value" of a nursing degree.

    The profession has lost the trust and respect of a large % of the general public.

    There have been over the last few years a series of "scandels" which have highlighted the role of the nurse and "failures" associted with the provision of care.

    Many of the problems are NOT associated with the individual registered nurse who has often found her/him self working in dangerous, understaffed wards/depts.

    It is time the so called "nurse leaders" admitted culpability instead of blaming clinical nurses for failings which are not of their making.




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  • Interesting comment from Jenny Jones.

    many of these comments seem to arise out of pure ignorance of the role of the nurse and at least three other nurses or ex-nurses, including myself, a midwife and a medical consultant have been battling for days to try and address this issue for the poorly informed, but seemingly, in some cases to the very self opinionated who prefer their opinions to actual fact, to no avail.

    I have posted the link to the study in the Lancet on several occasions for people to refer to but doubt from the comments many read it preferring to continue arguing from their own stance and own beliefs rather than basing their opinion on these latest research findings.

    If it can be suggested how improvements to nursing services are to be made why are the public so resistant to such changes and improvements and always seem to think they know better?

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